January 16, 2021

Trump

Lawyers working on the Trump campaign have said Rudy Giuliani seemed “deranged’ and ill-prepared to lead the legal effort to overturn the election result, reported The Washington Post Sunday. 

In a deep-dive into the Trump campaign’s unprecedented attempt to overturn the election result, the Post reports that a rift developed in the campaign’s legal team earlier in November. 

A turning point was reportedly a November 13 defeat in the 3rd District US Court of Appeals in Pennsylvania, where a judge threw out the Trump’s campaign’s bid to invalidate thousands of mail-in ballots received after Election Day. 

After the result some of the campaign’s key attorneys began to drift away from the effort to overturn the result, believing it signaled the end of the campaign’s bid to credibly challenge vote counts. But Giuliani, the president’s personal attorney, battled on. 

Giuliani’s efforts to overturn the election result have at times been farcical, with the former New York City mayor holding a press conference at a suburban garden center in an apparent mix-up in booking venues. At a media briefing on November 19, black liquid could be seen trickling down Giuliani’s face, and fellow campaign attorney Sidney Powell alleged a vast conspiracy to overturn the election involving Venezuelan communists and Democrats. 

Neither she nor Giuliani have provided compelling evidence to substantiate the claim, and the campaign has parted ways with Powell. 

According to the Post, some of the campaign and GOP attorneys involved in the election challenge began to distance themselves from Giuliani earlier in November and sought to avoid meetings with Giuliani and his team. When Giuliani and Powell were asked by other campaign officials for evidence to substantiate their fraud claims, they were unable to produce it. 

Read more: Joe Biden is hiring about 4,000 political staffers to work in the White House and federal agencies. Here’s how you can boost your chances getting a job in the new administration, according to 3 experts.

Some attorneys described Giuliani as seeming “deranged” in comments to the Post. 

Giuliani clashed with other Trump campaign attorneys, according to the report, and continued to tell the president he had a serious chance of winning his lawsuits, while other officials offered more realistic assessments. Trump after November 13 handed Giuliani and his team control of the legal effort. 

One senior administration official was scathing about Giuliani’s strategy. “Just roll everybody up who is willing to do it into a clown car, and when it’s time for a press conference, roll them out,” is how the official characterized it to the Post. 

The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Giuliani’s conspiracy theories have reportedly proved too much even for Trump, according to reports, and though he continues to claim the election was stolen from him he has approved vital funds be released for Biden’s transition. 

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Rudy Giuliani wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: Former Mayor of New York Rudy Giuliani, a lawyer for President Donald Trump, speaks during a news conference at the Republican National Committee headquarters, Thursday Nov. 19, 2020, in Washington. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin


© AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin
Former Mayor of New York Rudy Giuliani, a lawyer for President Donald Trump, speaks during a news conference at the Republican National Committee headquarters, Thursday Nov. 19, 2020, in Washington. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Lawyers working on the Trump campaign have said Rudy Giuliani seemed “deranged’ and ill-prepared to lead the legal effort to overturn the election result, reported The Washington Post Sunday. 

In a deep-dive into the Trump campaign’s unprecedented attempt to overturn the election result, the Post reports that a rift developed in the campaign’s legal team earlier in November. 

A turning point was reportedly a November 13 defeat in the 3rd District US Court of Appeals in Pennsylvania, where a judge threw out the Trump’s campaign’s bid to invalidate thousands of mail-in ballots received after Election Day. 

After the result some of the campaign’s key attorneys began to drift away from the effort to overturn the result, believing it signaled the end of the campaign’s bid to credibly challenge vote counts. But Giuliani, the president’s personal attorney, battled on. 

Giuliani’s efforts to overturn the election result have at times been farcical, with the former New York City mayor holding a press conference at a suburban garden center in an apparent mix-up in booking venues. At a media briefing on November 19, black liquid could be seen trickling down Giuliani’s face, and fellow campaign attorney Sidney Powell alleged a vast conspiracy to overturn the election involving Venezuelan communists and Democrats. 

Neither she nor Giuliani have provided compelling evidence to substantiate the claim, and the campaign has parted ways with Powell. 

According to the Post, some of the campaign and GOP attorneys involved in the election challenge began to distance themselves from Giuliani earlier in November and sought to avoid meetings with Giuliani and his team. When Giuliani and Powell were asked by other campaign officials for evidence to substantiate their fraud claims, they were unable to produce it. 

Some attorneys described Giuliani as seeming “deranged” in comments to the Post. 

Giuliani clashed with other Trump campaign attorneys, according to the report, and continued to tell the president he had a serious chance of winning his lawsuits, while other officials offered more realistic assessments. Trump after November 13 handed Giuliani and his team control of the legal effort. 

One senior administration official was scathing about Giuliani’s strategy. “Just roll everybody up who is willing to do it into a clown car, and when it’s time for a press conference, roll them out,” is how the official characterized it to the Post. 

The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Giuliani’s conspiracy theories have reportedly proved too much even for Trump, according to reports, and though he continues to claim the election was stolen from him he has approved vital funds be released for Biden’s transition. 

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  • President-elect Joe Biden gave an interview with the NBC News anchor Lester Holt on Tuesday in which he laid out his priorities for his first 100 days in office and discussed keeping the Justice Department independent as it relates to any investigations that might involve President Donald Trump.
  • “I will not do what this president does and use the Justice Department as my vehicle to insist that something happen,” Biden told Holt of a Trump investigation. “There are a number of investigations that I’ve read about that are at a state level — there’s nothing at all that I can or cannot do about that.”
  • “But I’m focused on getting the American public back at a place where they have some certainty, some surety, some knowledge that they can make it,” he continued.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President-elect Joe Biden says he won’t use the Justice Department as his personal “vehicle” to investigate President Donald Trump — echoing a campaign phrase about allowing the agency to be independent.

Biden appeared on “NBC Nightly News” with the anchor Lester Holt on Tuesday in Biden’s first televised interview since the November election. He was asked about tapping former Democratic rivals for his Cabinet, how the presidential transition was moving along, and how he envisioned a vaccine rollout next year.

During the interview, the president-elect laid out his priorities in his first 100 days upon taking office in January and responded to a question about investigations into Trump. As Business Insider’s Dave Levinthal previously reported, Trump could face a litany of federal and state investigations after leaving office.

“I will not do what this president does and use the Justice Department as my vehicle to insist that something happen,” Biden told Holt. “There are a number of investigations that I’ve read about that are at a state level — there’s nothing at all that I can or cannot do about that.”

“But I’m focused on getting the American public back at a place where they have some certainty, some surety, some knowledge that they can make it,” he continued. “The middle class and working-class people are being crushed. That’s my focus.”

Earlier this month, Rep. Bill Pascrell, a Democrat from New Jersey, called for federal investigations into Trump and members of his administration upon Biden’s transition into the White House, saying Trump had “attacked our elections and sought to throttle democracy.”

“He was rightly impeached by the House of Representatives,” Pascrell continued. “He has engaged in treachery, in treason. He has all but given up on governing and protecting our nation, and if he had a shred of dignity, he would resign today.

“Failure to hold financial and political wrongdoing accountable in the past has invited greater malfeasance by bad actors. A repeat of those failures in 2021 further emboldens criminality by our national leaders and continues America down the path of lawlessness and authoritarianism. There must be accountability.”

Read more: Everyone knows Kamala Harris and Jill Biden. Meet 12

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Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images


© Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

  • President-elect Joe Biden gave an interview with the NBC News anchor Lester Holt on Tuesday in which he laid out his priorities for his first 100 days in office and discussed keeping the Justice Department independent as it relates to any investigations that might involve President Donald Trump.
  • “I will not do what this president does and use the Justice Department as my vehicle to insist that something happen,” Biden told Holt of a Trump investigation. “There are a number of investigations that I’ve read about that are at a state level — there’s nothing at all that I can or cannot do about that.”
  • “But I’m focused on getting the American public back at a place where they have some certainty, some surety, some knowledge that they can make it,” he continued.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President-elect Joe Biden says he won’t use the Justice Department as his personal “vehicle” to investigate President Donald Trump — echoing a campaign phrase about allowing the agency to be independent.

Biden appeared on “NBC Nightly News” with the anchor Lester Holt on Tuesday in Biden’s first televised interview since the November election. He was asked about tapping former Democratic rivals for his Cabinet, how the presidential transition was moving along, and how he envisioned a vaccine rollout next year.

During the interview, the president-elect laid out his priorities in his first 100 days upon taking office in January and responded to a question about investigations into Trump. As Business Insider’s Dave Levinthal previously reported, Trump could face a litany of federal and state investigations after leaving office.

“I will not do what this president does and use the Justice Department as my vehicle to insist that something happen,” Biden told Holt. “There are a number of investigations that I’ve read about that are at a state level — there’s nothing at all that I can or cannot do about that.”

“But I’m focused on getting the American public back at a place where they have some certainty, some surety, some knowledge that they can make it,” he continued. “The middle class and working-class people are being crushed. That’s my focus.”

Earlier this month, Rep. Bill Pascrell, a Democrat from New Jersey, called for federal investigations into Trump and members of his administration upon Biden’s transition into the White House, saying Trump had “attacked our elections and sought to throttle democracy.”

“He was rightly impeached by the House of Representatives,” Pascrell continued. “He has engaged in treachery, in treason. He has all but given up on governing and protecting our nation, and if he had a shred of dignity, he would resign today.

“Failure to hold financial and political wrongdoing accountable in the past has invited greater malfeasance by bad actors. A repeat of those failures in 2021 further emboldens criminality by our national leaders and continues America

…...



Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images


© Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

  • President-elect Joe Biden said he wouldn’t use the Justice Department as his “vehicle” to investigate President Donald Trump — allowing the agency to be independent.
  • Biden laid out his priorities for his first 100 days in office to NBC News anchor Lester Holt in the president-elect’s first televised interview since the November election.
  • “I will not do what this president does and use the Justice Department as my vehicle to insist that something happen,” Biden told Holt. “There are a number of investigations that I’ve read about that are at a state level — there’s nothing at all that I can or cannot do about that.”
  • “But I’m focused on getting the American public back at a place where they have some certainty, some surety, some knowledge that they can make it,” he continued.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President-elect Joe Biden said he wouldn’t use the Justice Department as his “vehicle” to investigate President Donald Trump — echoing a campaign phrase about allowing the agency to be independent.

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Biden appeared on “NBC Nightly News” with anchor Lester Holt in his first televised interview since the November election, where he was asked about tapping former Democratic rivals for his cabinet, how the presidential transition was moving along, and how he envisions a vaccine rollout next year.

During the interview, the president-elect laid out his priorities in his first 100 days upon taking office in January and responded to a question about investigations into President Donald Trump. As Business Insider’s Dave Levinthal previously reported, Trump could face a litany of federal investigations.

“I will not do what this president does and use the Justice Department as my vehicle to insist that something happen,” Biden told Holt. “There are a number of investigations that I’ve read about that are at a state level — there’s nothing at all that I can or cannot do about that.”

“But I’m focused on getting the American public back at a place where they have some certainty, some surety, some knowledge that they can make it,” he continued. “The middle class and working-class people are being crushed. That’s my focus.”

Earlier this month, Rep. Bill Pascrell, a Democrat from New Jersey, called for federal investigations into Trump and members of his administration upon Biden’s transition into the White House.

“[The president] has attacked our elections and sought to throttle democracy,” Pascrell said. “He was rightly impeached by the House of Representatives. He has engaged in treachery, in treason. He has all but given up on governing and protecting our nation and if he had a shred of dignity he would resign today.”

Video: Sen. Paul: We must have in-person voting to limit potential for fraud (FOX News)

Sen. Paul: We must have in-person voting to limit potential for fraud

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“Failure to hold financial and political wrongdoing

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a car parked on the side of a building: Tesla is a founding member of a new lobbying group for electric cars.


© Jasper Juinen / Bloomberg / Getty
Tesla is a founding member of a new lobbying group for electric cars.

One of the stranger things that has happened during the Trump administration—a category with no small amount of competition—is that the car industry and the oil industry have grown to resent each other.

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This is more significant than it might seem. For decades, Detroit and Houston had a great, if unconventional, friendship: Car companies were well liked and well unionized, the makers of mechanized chariots that took Americans wherever they wanted to go, while oil companies were the grimier, greedier dealers of the magic juice that made those chariots run.

Automakers and oil companies grew up together, they hung out together, and they fought environmental and efficiency rules together. Their interests aligned: The more cars sold, the more oil burned; and the beefier the car, the more everyone made. Everyone benefited—except drivers, pedestrians, asthmatics, and future inhabitants of the Earth’s climate system, but where were those guys on the S&P?

But under President Donald Trump’s influence, the oil-and-gas industry has turned on car companies. First, it engineered a repeal of car-pollution rules that was so revanchist, so pro-carbon, the auto industry refused to support it. Then the White House killed a bipartisan deal to extend a tax credit for electric-car buyers, hurting Tesla, General Motors, and electrical utilities to the benefit of foreign automakers and the oil companies. American automakers were also walloped by Trump’s trade war with China.

Some of this drama originated from plain old oil-company rapacity. But much of it arose from the coalition-splintering effects of electric vehicles, or EVs. For decades, oil-and-gas companies, automakers, and electric utilities have had a tight and mostly united set of interests in Washington. But EVs ruin that harmony: They pose an existential threat to oil majors, because each additional EV on the road depresses gasoline demand. But to automakers and utilities, they represent the next great market.

Now, as the administration turns over, this new dispensation is being formalized. The electric-car industry is getting a lobbying group.

Today, more than two dozen automakers, electric utilities, EV-charging firms, and lithium companies are forming a new advocacy group devoted to pushing for electric cars on Capitol Hill. It’s called the Zero Emission Transportation Association, or ZETA.

“Our goal is to change politics so that every new vehicle sold by 2030 is an EV,” Joseph Britton, ZETA’s founder and director, told me. ZETA won’t look for regulation that requires anyone to buy an EV, he said. Instead, it will push for policy changes that make EVs irresistible to consumers.

In other words, ZETA will lobby Congress to build EV chargers, subsidize EV purchases, and help

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An altercation reportedly involving a man driving his car into a caravan of Trump supporters and then fighting with another man is currently being investigated by police in central California.

According to KEYT-TV Santa Barbara, a man was arrested on Sunday after driving his car into a pro-Trump parade after shouting profanities and throwing at least one bottle at parade attendees.

A video posted on social media appears to show 20-year-old Jacob Garza of Santa Maria, California, speeding through a stop sign in a BMW to engage with the Trump parade and ultimately being wrestled to the ground by a Trump supporter after crashing his car.

Garza reportedly caused the other vehicle to turn on its side, and two occupants of the vehicle were transported to a nearby hospital, with one suffering from a broken arm.

“Welcome to MAGA country motherf—er!” one man can be heard saying to Garza after wrestling him to the ground.

Garza was cited for reckless driving causing injury, and all witness statements were turned over to the local district attorney’s office, according to Santa Maria Police Sgt. Nate Totorica.

Several documented instances of violence directed toward Trump supporters have been reported across the country over the past several months, including in South Carolina, Delaware, and California.

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