Transportation – Hopkinton Public School District

COVID-19 Transportation Information

The Hopkinton Public Schools, like all school districts across the Commonwealth, were charged with designing a reentry plan, unique to the needs of the Hopkinton Community, and in keeping with the “Initial Fall School Reopening Guidance”  issued by the Commissioner of Education, Jeffrey Riley on June 25, 2020.  Here is the Transportation specific information.  Please see the full reentry plan for more details.  

9/23/2020 Transportation Change Requests

9/15/20 New Legacy North Bus Stops

9/14/2020 Transportation Reminders

9/7/2020 Transportation Welcome Back letter

 

New Student ID’s / Z Pass

Students will be issued a new smart Student ID.  The ID will have the student ID number as a bar code, an RFID chip and a QR code.  This ID will function as the bus pass, enable touchless payments in the cafeteria and more.  For transportation, the student ID must be scanned upon entering and exiting the bus.  The RFID chip interfaces with the new system called

Z Pass.   Z Pass ridership capability enables the district to know who is on the bus and where and when they entered or exited. The information is transmitted to a secure database.  The transportation department will use this information to locate a rider, and improve routes and utilization.  This will increase safety and efficiency for the district.  The Student ID will come hole punched for attaching  to backpacks, lanyards etc.  Students must have their ID at all times for riding the bus.  There will be a replacement fee charged for lost or damaged cards.

 

The district provides transportation to students in grades Kindergarten (K) through grade six (6).  Students in grades seven (7) through twelve (12) must purchase a bus pass to be eligible for transportation. Every effort will be made to provide safe, comfortable and pleasant transportation service while maintaining an appropriate level of efficiency. 

Effective transportation service requires cooperation among bus drivers & staff, school administrators, students and parents/guardians.  Transportation rules and procedures are provided so you can be familiar with our expectations and the transportation procedures.  The bus is an extension of the classroom and the bus driver is an extension of the teacher, thus all district policies are also observed on district transportation.

The Transportation Office is located in the HPS Central Administration building at 
89 Hayden Rowe Street, Hopkinton, MA.

The new Student ID must be scanned upon entering and exiting the bus.  All students should be at their designated bus stop 5-10 minutes before their scheduled pick-up time.  It is the parent responsibility to get students to and from the bus stop.  Bus routes will be published the last week of August.  Please see below for additional information based on your student grade level.

GRADES K-5          GRADE 6          GRADES 7-12

 

Additional Information:

BUS CONDUCT ITEMS ALLOWED ON THE BUS PARKING PASS

 KINDERGARTEN PROTOCOLS TRANSPORTATION FAQ’s

Transportation Forms:

Application for Bus Pass (PAPER)      Bus Stop Review Request Form

PAY ONLINE USING THE MYSCHOOLBUCKS LINK BELOW – FOLLOW DIRECTIONS ON HOW TO PAY ONLINE HERE. 

OR PAPER APPLICATION BUTTON

Transportation Overview

The front and side of a school bus

Transportation Updates for the 2020-21 School Year

See what’s new for transportation in the 2020-2021 school year

Transportation Information

In accordance with Chancellor’s Regulation A-801 (see below for regulation with translations) , the DOE provides transportation to all eligible New York City students in public, charter, and non-public schools. In partnership with the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) and our school age and preschool bus companies, our mission is to ensure safe and reliable transportation to and from school.

See Transportation Rights for what you and your child can expect from DOE transportation services.

You can print out the Transportation Overview for Families, available in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, English, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Urdu.

Get Your Child’s Bus Information

District and charter school parents: Sign up for your NYC Schools Account (NYCSA) to view information on your child’s transportation services and busing information.

Your school can provide you with your child’s student ID.

Non-public school parents: Please contact your school to get information about your child’s bus information.

DOE employees: visit Student Profile for student school and bus information or see Transportation Resources for Schools on the InfoHub for additional information.

Note: Access to the Student Transportation Search page is no longer available.

Why is the Bus Late?

Sometimes buses are delayed because of traffic congestion or mechanical failure. Check our bus delays page to see if your child’s route has been affected.

Types of Transportation Service

Transportation services that are available to families vary by school and by each child’s eligibility for those services. Speak with your school if you have questions about the available options.

  • At minimum, schools will provide student MetroCards to eligible students
  • Schools may also offer stop-to-school bus service if sufficient students meet busing eligibility criteria
  • Curb-to-school or specialized bus service is provided to students whose medical, health, or disability-related conditions or special circumstances prevent them from being able to walk or utilize other forms of transportation to get to and from school.

MetroCard

Full-fare student MetroCards are provided at no cost to eligible students and are good on MTA subways and non-express buses.

Student MetroCards are different from regular MetroCards. A student MetroCard has three trips and three transfers.

(Subway + bus = one trip and one transfer)

Visit our MetroCards page to learn more.

Stop-to-School Bus Service

School bus transportation refers to picking up and dropping off one or more students at designated bus stops. To use this service, your school must participate in the bus program and your child must be eligible.

Contact your school for more information on school bus service.

Curb-to-School or Specialized Bus Service

This type of transportation utilizes vehicles that are equipped to meet the transportation accommodations listed on a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) or 504 Accommodations Plan and have a trained driver and an attendant on-board. Curb-to-school specialized bus services pick up and drop off the student at the safest locations near the student’s home.

  • Students in grades K-12 with an IEP that recommends

Phoenix Public Transportation | Get Around With Bus & Rail

  • Need to get from the airport to your downtown hotel? It will cost you $2 if you take Phoenix’s Valley Metro light-rail system. The cost of an all-day pass is $4.

  • But getting from the airport to downtown affordably is just one of light rail’s perks. The 28-mile line links Phoenix to the neighboring communities of Tempe and Mesa, and includes stops at attractions such as Phoenix Art Museum, Heard Museum, Chase Field, Talking Stick Resort Arena and Tempe’s Mill Avenue.

  • Light rail’s quiet, air-conditioned trains operate 18-22 hours per day, seven days a week, and stop every 12-20 minutes. The system operates at street level and is powered by electricity from overhead wires.

  • There are 38 stations along the line, and they are adorned with $8 million worth of public art. The artwork at each station reflects the character of the community where it is located. Station platforms can accommodate the boarding of 600 passengers onto a three-car train within 30 seconds. 

  • Convenient transportation to the airport comes by way of PHX Sky Train. This driverless people mover transports Valley Metro Light Rail passengers to the airport from the 44th Street/Washington Street station.

  • Maps


  • Source Article

    Transportation | City of Tempe, AZ

    The Transportation Division is responsible for street signage, pavement markings, barricading, traffic control, street maintenance, sidewalks, traffic signals, street lights, bus and light rail service, and bike lanes and paths.

    BikeBusStreetsStreetscapeVisionZeroFacilitiesPermitsResourcesCommission

    The Tempe Transportation Center is closed due to the coronavirus (COVID-19).
    The Tempe Transit Store will be open effective June 15, 2020. Until June 15, to get a residential parking permit or youth transit pass or to schedule an appointment with staff, please email rpp@tempe.gov or call 480-858-2276 (Youth Transit Pass and RPP permits) or 480-350-8663 (all other appointments). 

    Click here to report a problem with traffic signals, graffiti, streets, barricades, street lights or any other transportation issue.

    For bus, Orbit, light rail and Express route complaints or suggestions, please call 602-253-5000 or email Valley Metro at csr@valleymetro.org.  

    Sign up to receive the latest transportation news. 

    Tempe Transportation Center

    200 E. Fifth Street

    Tempe, AZ 85281

    480-350-4311

    24-hour non-emergency: (480) 350-8311

    The Tempe Transit Store is open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on major holidays. Local and reduced all-day, 7-day, 15-day, 31-day bus passes are available for purchase. Acceptable forms of payment include cash, VISA and MasterCard. Reduced Fare Program IDs are issued from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays.

    The Deputy Director for Engineering & Transportation Department is  Shelly Seyler. For general questions about the transportation program, please contact Sue Taaffe

    Source Article

    Transportation in New York City

    Transportation in New York City
    Map of New York Highlighting New York City.svg
    Map of the U.S. state of New York with New York City highlighted in red
    Overview
    Owner Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, State of New Jersey, other local governments
    Locale New York City metropolitan area
    Transit type Rapid transit, commuter rail, bus and bus rapid transit, light rail, people mover, aerial tramway, bicycle sharing system, taxicab
    Daily ridership More than 10 million
    Operation
    Operator(s) MTA, NJ Transit, PATH, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and private operators

    The transportation system of New York City is a network of complex infrastructural systems. New York City, being the most populous city in the United States, has a transportation system which includes one of the largest subway systems in the world; the world’s first mechanically ventilated vehicular tunnel; and an aerial tramway. New York City is also home to an extensive bus system in each of the five boroughs; citywide and Staten Island ferry systems; and numerous yellow taxis and boro taxis throughout the city. Private cars are less used compared to other cities in the rest of the United States.

    Within the New York City metropolitan area, the airport system—which includes John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, Newark Liberty International Airport (located in New Jersey), Stewart Airport and a few smaller facilities—is one of the largest in the world. The Port of New York and New Jersey, which includes the waterways around New York City and its metropolitan area, is one of the busiest seaports in the United States. There are also three commuter rail systems, the PATH rapid transit system to New Jersey, and various ferries between Manhattan and New Jersey. Numerous separate bus systems also operate to Westchester County, Nassau County, and New Jersey. For private vehicles, a system of expressways and parkways connects New York City with its suburbs.

    Background[edit]

    An 1807 version of grid plan for Manhattan.

    History[edit]

    The history of New York City’s transportation system began with the Dutch port of Nieuw Amsterdam. The port had maintained several roads; some were built atop former Lenape trails, others as “commuter” links to surrounding cities, and one was even paved by 1658 from orders of Petrus Stuyvesant, according to Burrow, et al.[1] The 19th century brought changes to the format of the system’s transport: the establishment of a Manhattan street grid through the Commissioners’ Plan of 1811,[2] as well as an unprecedented link between the then-separate cities of New York and Brooklyn via the Brooklyn Bridge, in 1883.[3]

    The Second Industrial Revolution fundamentally changed the city – the port infrastructure grew at such a rapid pace after the 1825 completion of the Erie Canal that New York became the most important connection between all of Europe and the interior of the United States. Elevated trains and subterranean transportation (‘El trains’ and ‘subways’) were introduced between 1867 and 1904. In 1904, the first subway line became operational.

    THE BEST Seattle Transportation – Tripadvisor

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    * TripAdvisor LLC is not a booking agent and does not charge any service fees to users of our site…
    TripAdvisor LLC is not responsible for content on external web sites. Taxes, fees not included for deals content.

    Best 30 Transportation in Cheney, KS with Reviews

    YP – The Real Yellow PagesSM – helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business’s suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.

    Source Article

    Kansas Department Of Transportation in Hutchinson, KS with Reviews

    YP – The Real Yellow PagesSM – helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business’s suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.

    Source Article

    CDC – CDC Transportation Recommendations

    The Healthy Community Design Initiative, also known as the Built Environment and Health Initiative, is no longer a funded program and the information on this website is not being reviewed and updated on a regular basis.

     

    The U.S. transportation system has been shaped by multiple policy inputs and concrete actions which have arisen from transportation and community planners, funding agencies and others at Federal, state and local levels. Today, the system is designed to move people and goods efficiently; however, there is a growing awareness across communities that transportation systems impact quality of life and health. Government and non-government agencies are seeking innovative policies and programs that protect and promote health while accomplishing the primary transportation objectives.

    Recommendations [PDF – 94 KB]

    Fact Sheet [PDF – 388 KB]

    The Opportunity

    Expanding the availability of, safety for, and access to a variety of transportation options and integrating health-enhancing choices into transportation policy has the potential to save lives by preventing chronic diseases, reducing and preventing motor-vehicle-related injury and deaths, improving environmental health, while stimulating economic development, and ensuring access for all people.

    With this goal in mind, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified transportation policies that can have profound positive impact on health. CDC supports strategies that can provide a balanced portfolio of transportation choices that supports health and reduces health care costs. Transportation policy can:

    • Reduce injuries associated with motor vehicle crashes
    • Encourage healthy community design
    • Promote safe and convenient opportunities for physical activity by supporting active transportation infrastructure
    • Reduce human exposure to air pollution and adverse health impacts associated with these pollutants
    • Ensure that all people have access to safe, healthy, convenient, and affordable transportation

    Woman riding in a bike lane

    Rationale

    The current U.S. transportation infrastructure focuses on motor vehicle travel and provides limited support for other transportation options for most Americans.

    • Physical activity and active transportation have declined compared to previous generations. The lack of physical activity is a major contributor to the steady rise in rates of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke and other chronic health conditions in the United States.
    • Motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of injury-related death for many age groups. Pedestrians and bicyclists are at an even greater risk of death from crashes than those who travel by motor vehicles.
    • Many Americans view walking and bicycling within their communities as unsafe because of traffic and the lack of sidewalks, crosswalks, and bicycle facilities.
    • Although using public transportation has historically been safer than highway travel in light duty vehicles, highway travel has grown more quickly than other modes of travel.
    • A lack of efficient alternatives to automobile travel disproportionately affects vulnerable populations such as the poor, the elderly, people who have disabilities and children by limiting access to jobs, health care, social interaction, and healthy foods.
    • Although motor vehicle emissions have decreased significantly over the past three decades, air pollution from motor vehicles continues to contribute to the degradation of our environment and adverse respiratory and cardiovascular health effects.
    • Transportation accounts for

    Penal transportation – Wikipedia

    Relocation of convicted criminals to a distant place

    Women in England mourning their lovers who are soon to be transported to Botany Bay, 1792

    Penal transportation or transportation was the relocation of convicted criminals, or other persons regarded as undesirable, to a distant place, often a colony for a specified term; later, specifically established penal colonies became their destination. While the prisoners may have been released once the sentences were served, they generally did not have the resources to return home.

    Origin and implementation[edit]

    Banishment or forced exile from a polity or society has been used as a punishment since at least Ancient Roman times. The practice reached its height in the British Empire during the 18th and 19th centuries.[1]

    Transportation removed the offender from society, mostly permanently, but was seen as more merciful than capital punishment. This method was used for criminals, debtors, military prisoners, and political prisoners.[citation needed]

    Penal transportation was also used as a method of colonization. For example, from the earliest days of English colonial schemes, new settlements beyond the seas were seen as a way to alleviate domestic social problems of criminals and the poor as well as to increase the colonial labour force,[1] for the overall benefit of the realm.[2]

    Great Britain and the British Empire[edit]

    Initially based on the royal prerogative of mercy,[3] and later under English Law, transportation was an alternative sentence imposed for a felony. It was typically imposed for offences for which death was deemed too severe. By 1670, as new felonies were defined, the option of being sentenced to transportation was allowed.[4][5] Forgery of a document, for example, was a capital crime until the 1820s, when the penalty was reduced to transportation. Depending on the crime, the sentence was imposed for life or for a set period of years. If imposed for a period of years, the offender was permitted to return home after serving his time, but had to make his own way back. Many offenders thus stayed in the colony as free persons, and might obtain employment as jailers or other servants of the penal colony.

    England transported its convicts and political prisoners, as well as prisoners of war from Scotland and Ireland, to its overseas colonies in the Americas from the 1610s until early in the American Revolution in 1776, when transportation to America was temporarily suspended by the Criminal Law Act 1776 (16 Geo. 3 c. 43).[6] The practice was mandated in Scotland by an act of 1785, but was less used there than in England. Transportation on a large scale resumed with the departure of the First Fleet to Australia in 1787, and continued there until 1868.

    Transportation was not used by Scotland before the Act of Union 1707; following union, the Transportation Act 1717 specifically excluded its use in Scotland.[7] Under the Transportation, etc. Act 1785 (25 Geo. 3 c. 46) the Parliament of Great Britain