December 1, 2020

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China Automotive Systems (NASDAQ:CAAS) news for Monday includes new sales numbers of its steering units boosting CAAS stock higher today.

an electric car plugged in for charging, representing electric car stocks

Source: buffaloboy / Shutterstock.com

A news release from China Automotive Systems notes that the company has sold 120,000 steering units so far in 2020. The company also mentions that it expects the total number of units sold during the year to surpass 140,000.

To go along with this news, China Automotive Systems also says that it’s expecting sales of steering units to increase further in 2021. The company’s current guidance is for more than 200,000 steering units to sell during the year.

China Automotive Systems offers its steering units to makers of electric vehicles (EVs) in China. Its customers include Chery Automobile, Beijing Auto, JAC Motors, Dongfeng Auto, and Hozon Auto.

Hanlin Chen, chairman of China Automotive Systems, said the following about the news.

“These sales continue our long trend of providing advanced steering products to the largest automobile manufacturers in China. We are pleased to meet their high requirements for excellent performance and quality. We have shipped a large number of our EPS steering products to Great Wall Motors for their new EV model in 2020, and will continue to ship to them in 2021.”

CAAS stock is experiencing heavy trading following the news. As of this writing, more than 26 million shares of the stock have changed hands. That’s a massive spike compared to its daily average trading volume of just 110,000 shares.

CAAS stock was up 61.1% as of Monday morning and is up 94.6% since the start of the year.

On the date of publication, William White did not have (either directly or indirectly) any positions in the securities mentioned in this article.

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The Los Angeles Police Commission ruled Tuesday that an LAPD sergeant acted within department policy when he fatally shot a 31-year-old man who was holding a bicycle part that resembled a handgun in Culver City in January.



a man standing in front of a building: The L.A. Police Commission ruled Tuesday that a sergeant's fatal shooting of 31-year-old Victor Valencia was justified. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)


© (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)
The L.A. Police Commission ruled Tuesday that a sergeant’s fatal shooting of 31-year-old Victor Valencia was justified. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

The unanimous decision, justifying the sergeant’s actions and clearing him of any punishment, came after family members of Victor Valencia told the commission during a virtual Zoom meeting that Valencia suffered from mental illness, was of little threat and deserved better.

“There’s other ways to go about things,” said Sara Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin. “What gave the reason for this officer to shoot down my cousin like he was nothing?”

Cervantes and another family member said that officers should be better trained to understand people with mental illness and see them as people deserving of compassion.

Commission President Eileen Decker told the family that the commission would hear all the evidence in the case and “adjudicate the case fairly and objectively in accordance with the law.”

The commission then went into closed session, where it agreed with recommendations from LAPD Chief Michel Moore and a separate panel that reviews police shootings that Sgt. Colin Langsdale, who shot Valencia, should receive a tactical debriefing but was otherwise in line with department policy and therefore justified in his actions.

Valencia’s killing has been protested by activists in the city who said Valencia did not have a gun and should not have been shot.

The commission’s ruling comes amid a broader discussion in L.A. about the role police should play in cases involving people suffering from mental illness, with activists and police agreeing that alternative mental health providers would be better equipped to respond to certain calls for help.

However, it’s likely the call that brought Langsdale to the Culver City street where Valencia was would elicit a police response regardless, given its nature.

According to a report Moore provided to the commission Tuesday, Langsdale responded to the area of South Sepulveda and South Venice boulevards about 12:45 p.m. Saturday after police received reports of a man with a gun — with one caller saying he was “waving it around.”

Langsdale did not have his body camera activated when he first arrived at the scene, according to police. Once he activated it, it captured Valencia already on the ground and Langsdale standing behind the open door of his police car, gun drawn.

Langsdale said he believed Valencia had a gun. Other witnesses at the scene said they also believed he had a gun. Surveillance footage from a local gas station released by police showed Valencia holding up the bicycle part and appearing agitated.

Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin, said she suffers from depression, and that L.A. needs more services and programs for people suffering from mental illness, and LAPD officers need far better training on how to interact

…...

The Los Angeles Police Commission ruled Tuesday that an LAPD sergeant acted within department policy when he fatally shot a 31-year-old man who was holding a bicycle part that resembled a handgun in Culver City in January.

The unanimous decision, justifying the sergeant’s actions and clearing him of any punishment, came after family members of Victor Valencia told the commission during a virtual Zoom meeting that Valencia suffered from mental illness, was of little threat and deserved better.

“There’s other ways to go about things,” said Sara Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin. “What gave the reason for this officer to shoot down my cousin like he was nothing?”

Cervantes and another family member said that officers should be better trained to understand people with mental illness and see them as people deserving of compassion.

Commission President Eileen Decker told the family that the commission would hear all the evidence in the case and “adjudicate the case fairly and objectively in accordance with the law.”

The commission then went into closed session, where it agreed with recommendations from LAPD Chief Michel Moore and a separate panel that reviews police shootings that Sgt. Colin Langsdale, who shot Valencia, should receive a tactical debriefing but was otherwise in line with department policy and therefore justified in his actions.

Valencia’s killing has been protested by activists in the city who said Valencia did not have a gun and should not have been shot.

The commission’s ruling comes amid a broader discussion in L.A. about the role police should play in cases involving people suffering from mental illness, with activists and police agreeing that alternative mental health providers would be better equipped to respond to certain calls for help.

However, it’s likely the call that brought Langsdale to the Culver City street where Valencia was would elicit a police response regardless, given its nature.

According to a report Moore provided to the commission Tuesday, Langsdale responded to the area of South Sepulveda and South Venice boulevards about 12:45 p.m. Saturday after police received reports of a man with a gun — with one caller saying he was “waving it around.”

Langsdale did not have his body camera activated when he first arrived at the scene, according to police. Once he activated it, it captured Valencia already on the ground and Langsdale standing behind the open door of his police car, gun drawn.

Langsdale said he believed Valencia had a gun. Other witnesses at the scene said they also believed he had a gun. Surveillance footage from a local gas station released by police showed Valencia holding up the bicycle part and appearing agitated.

Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin, said she suffers from depression, and that L.A. needs more services and programs for people suffering from mental illness, and LAPD officers need far better training on how to interact with people in the throes of a mental health crisis.

“They need to know how to deal with people with our state of minds,” she said. “It’s not our fault that

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A 14-year-old boy has pleaded guilty in adult court to fatally shooting an older teenager seated in a parked pickup truck in St. Paul.

The St. Paul teen is scheduled to be sentenced on Dec. 17 after admitting Friday to second-degree unintentional murder in connection with the death on Sept. 1 of Jorge E. Batres, 17, of Coon Rapids, on the city’s East Side.

Officers were called to the 1200 block of Hazelwood Street about 6 p.m., where they found Batres in the driver’s seat of the pickup with a gunshot wound to the head. He was declared dead at the scene.

The teen’s mother and law enforcement agreed that he be prosecuted as an adult and receive a 12-year sentence, with the first eight years served while incarcerated, said county attorney spokesman Dennis Gerhardstein. The agreement also calls for dismissal of a second-degree intentional murder count.

Defense attorney Mike Padden declined to comment about the case.

The state sees very few suspects this young or younger accused of murder. Since 2001, there have been at least eight others who were 14 and younger charged with murder in Minnesota, according to a state judicial branch spokesman.

While the criminal complaint and the County Attorney’s Office has publicly identified the defendant by name, the Star Tribune is withholding his identity because of his age.

According to the criminal complaint:

One of two witnesses told police that the teen and Batres appeared to struggle in the pickup. One shot was fired while both were in the vehicle. The suspect got out and shot Batres again, took money from inside the vehicle and ran off.

Video surveillance from a nearby market showed the teen about half-hour earlier wearing the same yellow bandanna as described by one of the witnesses.

Batres’ sister told an investigator that he had accumulated more than $1,000. Investigators searched the suspect’s home and seized $1,525 and three bags of marijuana from his bedroom.

Officers located the teen, and he said he was at the market earlier “but went home to take a shower and then came back with his mother,” the complaint read.

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A 14-year-old boy has pleaded guilty in adult court to fatally shooting an older teenager seated in a parked pickup truck in St. Paul.

The St. Paul teen is scheduled to be sentenced on Dec. 17 after admitting Friday to second-degree unintentional murder in connection with the death on Sept. 1 of Jorge E. Batres, 17, of Coon Rapids, on the city’s East Side.

Officers were called to the 1200 block of Hazelwood Street about 6 p.m., where they found Batres in the driver’s seat of the pickup with a gunshot wound to the head. He was declared dead at the scene.

The teen’s mother and law enforcement agreed that he be prosecuted as an adult and receive a 12-year sentence, with the first eight years served while incarcerated, said county attorney spokesman Dennis Gerhardstein. The agreement also calls for dismissal of a second-degree intentional murder count.

Defense attorney Mike Padden declined to comment about the case.

The state sees very few suspects this young or younger accused of murder. Since 2001, there have been at least eight others who were 14 and younger charged with murder in Minnesota, according to a state judicial branch spokesman.

While the criminal complaint and the County Attorney’s Office has publicly identified the defendant by name, the Star Tribune is withholding his identity because of his age.

According to the criminal complaint:

One of two witnesses told police that the teen and Batres appeared to struggle in the pickup. One shot was fired while both were in the vehicle. The suspect got out and shot Batres again, took money from inside the vehicle and ran off.

Video surveillance from a nearby market showed the teen about half-hour earlier wearing the same yellow bandanna as described by one of the witnesses.

Batres’ sister told an investigator that he had accumulated more than $1,000. Investigators searched the suspect’s home and seized $1,525 and three bags of marijuana from his bedroom.

Officers located the teen, and he said he was at the market earlier “but went home to take a shower and then came back with his mother,” the complaint read.

Paul Walsh • 612-673-4482

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©2020 the Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Visit the Star Tribune (Minneapolis) at www.startribune.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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A person has died following a shooting on the city’s northwest side Saturday evening.

Raw video: Capt. Lawrence Wheeler of IMPD talks about a homicide on the northwest side

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Officers were dispatched to the intersection of 52nd Street and Georgetown Road around 6:30 p.m., where one man was found dead inside a vehicle with what appeared to be gunshot wounds, according to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department. 



a street filled with traffic at night: A man was killed in a car at the intersection of 52nd Street and Georgetown Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020, according to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department.


© Holly V. Hays/IndyStar
A man was killed in a car at the intersection of 52nd Street and Georgetown Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020, according to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department.

Several other people were inside the car with the victim, IMPD Capt. Lawrence Wheeler said, but no one else was injured.

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That car is still in the road and the intersection will be closed for several hours as police investigators gather evidence.

The victim has not yet been identified. There is no information yet on possible suspects.

Indianapolis broke its previous record of criminal homicides in October when it hit 160. 

Of the city’s ongoing violence, Wheeler said, “It’s terrible, and there isn’t a lot of reason behind it, it seems, to any of it.”

“Doesn’t seem like a lot of reason to take another person’s life,” he said of the latest  fatal shooting. “Just don’t understand why all this shooting’s going on and it’s very frustrating for us.”

Anyone with information regarding the incident is encouraged to contact the IMPD Homicide Office at 317-327-3475 or Crime Stoppers of Central Indiana at 317-262-8477 or online at crimetips.org. Information shared with Crime Stoppers is considered anonymous.

You can reach IndyStar reporter Holly Hays at 317-444-6156 or [email protected] Follow her on Twitter: @hollyvhays.

This article originally appeared on Indianapolis Star: IMPD: 1 found dead in vehicle in northwest-side shooting

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A Palm Beach County sheriff’s deputy crossed the line when he kept shooting at a driver and chased him until he rammed the driver’s car to stop him, his agency has concluded.



a car parked in a parking lot: Palm Beach Sheriff's Deputy Connor Haugh shot at a man’s car as the man tried to get away, according to an internal affairs report. He was suspended for violating the agency's use-of-force policy.


© Austen Erblat/South Florida Comm/South Florida Sun Sentinel/South Florida Sun Sentinel/TNS
Palm Beach Sheriff’s Deputy Connor Haugh shot at a man’s car as the man tried to get away, according to an internal affairs report. He was suspended for violating the agency’s use-of-force policy.

Deputy Connor Haugh, 37, violated agency policy last year when Fakeria Phillips, then 38, drove away and Haugh kept shooting, according to a sheriff’s internal affairs report. He also broke policy when he followed Phillips and used his patrol car to ram Phillips’ car, according to the report. Even though the deputy opened fire, nobody was shot in the encounter that happened on Nov. 1, 2019, records show.

Haugh told investigators that he was trying to protect the public: He felt the risk of injuries to civilians posed by Phillips’ driving was too great to allow him to keep going.

Haugh is a veteran officer who started at the Boynton Beach Police Department in 2005 and joined the Sheriff’s Office in 2016. The Sheriff’s Office has suspended Haugh, though the terms of his suspension weren’t available Thursday.

Reached by phone Thursday, Haugh said that he couldn’t comment about the case. A police union representative couldn’t be reached for comment.

Last year, an undercover deputy — not Haugh — had tried to pull over Phillips while he was driving a rented Hyundai. The undercover deputy suspected that Phillips was dealing drugs out of the parking lot of the Barefoot Mailman Motel in Lantana while on federal probation, the records show.

That’s when Phillips backed the car into the undercover deputy’s unmarked patrol car, hitting that deputy with the open door of the Hyundai, the Sheriff’s Office said.

Haugh was nearby on an alternate assignment, heard what was happening over his radio and headed to the scene.

Internal affairs investigators interviewed Haugh and reviewed nearby security camera footage to determine that Haugh’s fears that the other deputy was in imminent danger were “well-founded.”

In an effort to stop Phillips, Haugh shot at one of Phillips’ tires. The internal affairs investigation ruled that those first few shots, when Phillips was still in the parking lot, were justified. But Phillips made it out of the parking lot and drove south in the northbound lanes of Dixie Highway.

Haugh then shot at the car again, hitting one of its tires.

Shooting at a moving vehicle is prohibited under the sheriff’s use-of-force policy, “unless the occupant of a vehicle is using or threatening to use deadly force by means other than the vehicle itself, and the employee reasonably believes there is an imminent threat to life.” The investigation concluded that after Phillips left the parking lot, he was no longer using deadly force.

Haugh opened fire as Phillips was still in the parking lot and then after Phillips left:

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Video released by a Florida sheriff’s office shows two deputies pulling their weapons and one firing at a car as it drives near him in a shooting that killed two Black teenagers. The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office released the video Tuesday after the teenagers’ families and their attorney, famed civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, demanded more information about last Friday’s events that led to the fatal shooting of A.J. Crooms, 16, and Sincere Pierce, 18.

The sheriff’s office said in a Facebook post that Deputies Jafet Santiago-Miranda and Carson Hendren were doing a follow-up investigation on what they thought was a stolen car. When they spotted the car, they followed it as it drove through a residential neighborhood and then pulled into the driveway of a home.

Dashcam video shows the deputies, in two different squad cars, getting out of their vehicles as the car they are following starts backing out of the driveway. Santiago-Miranda says repeatedly, “Stop the vehicle.”

The vehicle stops for a few seconds, backs up a bit and then drives in the direction of Santiago-Miranda as the deputy fires his weapon, according to the video.

Santiago-Miranda “was then forced to fire his service weapon in an attempt to stop the deadly threat of the car from crashing into him,” the sheriff’s office Facebook post said.

Crump said Wednesday in a tweet that the video shows the teens were terrified and tried to drive around the deputies. Out of harm’s way, Santiago-Miranda moved closer to the car to get a better shot, Crump said.

Crump has previously represented the families of Trayvon Martin, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and Jacob Blake.

“I was angry about it, I was angry because I miss him,” Crooms’ mother Tasha Strachan told CBS affiliate WKMG-TV. “I want answers to why that was done, it didn’t have to be done like that.”  

The deputies involved in the fatal shooting have been put on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

Meanwhile, scores of protesters carrying signs that said “Who Do You Call When Police Murder?” and “Prosecute the Police,” walked along a busy road in Cocoa on Wednesday evening, chanting “Justice for A.J. Justice for Spud,” a nickname for Pierce.

WKMG reports the teens’ cousin, Charity Baxter, wants to know why deadly force was necessary in this situation.

“When you did approach him, why was the first thing to shoot?” Baxter said.

Pierce’s family said they are asking for justice.

“I’m looking for a little closure,” Pierce’s mother Qausheda Pierce said. “We want some answers.”

In a news release, the Office of the State

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COCOA, Fla. (AP) — Video released by a Florida sheriff’s office shows two deputies pulling their weapons and one firing at a car as it drives at him in a shooting that killed two Black teenagers.

The Brevard County Sheriff’s Office released the video Tuesday after the teenagers’ families and their attorney, famed civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, demanded more information about last Friday’s events that led to the fatal shooting of A.J. Crooms, 16, and Sincere Pierce, 18.

The sheriff’s office said in a Facebook post that Deputies Jafet Santiago-Miranda and Carson Hendren were doing a follow-up investigation on what they thought was a stolen car. When they spotted the car, they followed it as it drove through a residential neighborhood and then pulled into the driveway of a home.

Dashcam video shows the deputies, in two different squad cars, getting out of their vehicles as the car they are following starts backing out of the driveway. Santiago-Miranda says repeatedly, “Stop the vehicle.”

The vehicle stops for a few seconds, backs up a bit and then drives in the direction of Santiago-Miranda as the deputy fires his weapon, according to the video.

Santiago-Miranda “was then forced to fire his service weapon in an attempt to stop the deadly threat of the car from crashing into him,” the sheriff’s office Facebook post said.

“For two young Black teens just beginning their lives to be ended is a tragedy and a terrible loss to their families and to the community,” Crump said in a statement Monday.

Crump has previously represented the families of Trayvon Martin, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and Jacob Blake.

The deputies involved in the fatal shooting have been put on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

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RALEIGH

Shots were fired rapidly from a Dodge Charger the night a 25-year-old woman was fatally shot near a nightclub in northeast Raleigh, according to a recently released 911 call.

The caller said a person in the car fired multiple shots from what he thought was an automatic pistol.

“They were leaving a club, I imagine Paris Lounge,” the caller said.

Maya Elaine Rogers, 25, was shot in the incident early Friday morning and died from her injuries at WakeMed.

Two suspects from Thomasville, N.C., have been arrested in Rogers’ death. Thomasville is just outside of High Point.

Christopher Deandre Gregg, 20, was charged with murder and Daron Fitzgerald Pouncy, 22, was charged with accessory after the fact to murder and possession of firearm by a felon, according to police.

2nd fatal shooting outside lounge

This is the second fatal shooting in the parking lot of Paris Lounge within the past year.

In December 2019, a man died from his injuries after police found him in the parking lot on a Sunday morning after an event billed as a celebrity birthday bash, The News & Observer reported.

Nuness Biongo, one of the owners of the Paris Lounge, previously told The N&O last year’s shooting followed a fight between two groups in the parking lot.

The N&O called Biongo Monday and Tuesday to ask about security measures the nightclub takes and the latest shooting, but he did not return multiple calls.

After the December shooting, he said the club had a 15-member security team and two off-duty police officers.

Previous 911 calls

Those are not the only shootings reported in the 5500 block of Atlantic Springs Road. Police records show there have been more than 300 911 calls to the address since March 2019, when Biongo told The N&O the club opened. Other establishments in the block address include a restaurant, a billiards hall and a candy store.

Of those calls, 11 reported shots being fired, shots being fired into a building or people being shot.

ABC liquor permits revoked at Starbar

Last month, the N.C. Department of Public Safety’s Alcohol Law Enforcement division revoked the ABC permit of a bar in east Raleigh.

Starbar at 1731 Trawick Road had “assaults, fights, shots fired, shootings, gunshot victims, stabbings and hundreds of calls for service,” the agency stated in a press release.

ALE revoked Starbar’s license a week after the second homicide in less than a year was reported near the bar. “Two security employees were arrested in connection with the shooting,” the release stated.

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©2020 The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.)

Visit The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) at www.newsobserver.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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