November 28, 2020

police

Friday, Nov. 27, 2020 | 7:35 p.m.

A hit-and-run suspect who himself was struck by a vehicle as he fled Metro Police custody on foot earlier this month died on Thursday, officials said.

Metro said on Friday that the man perished at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center and that its Force Investigation Team, which also probes in-custody deaths, was involved in the subsequent investigation.

On the morning of Nov. 16, Metro officers responded to a hit-and-run crash near Spring Mountain Road and Valley View Boulevard, police said.

Officers received information that a vehicle matching the one the suspect fled in was spotted nearby and pulled it over.

While the officers were talking to the man, he slipped out of handcuffs and took off running, police said. He jumped over the Desert Inn Super Arterial and was “immediately struck” by a vehicle heading west on the road, police said.

He was hospitalized in serious condition. His name and cause and manner of death will be released by the Clark County Coroner’s Office.

window.fbAsyncInit=function(){FB.init({appId:"112951308742607",status:!0,cookie:!0,xfbml:!0,oauth:!0}),FB.Event.subscribe("edge.create",function(e){ga("send",{hitType:"social",socialNetwork:"Facebook",socialAction:"like",socialTarget:e})}),FB.Event.subscribe("edge.remove",function(e){ga("send",{hitType:"social",socialNetwork:"Facebook",socialAction:"unlike",socialTarget:e})}),FB.Event.subscribe("message.send",function(e){ga("send",{hitType:"social",socialNetwork:"Facebook",socialAction:"send",socialTarget:e})})},function(e){var o,c="facebook-jssdk";e.getElementById(c)||((o=e.createElement("script")).id=c,o.async=!0,o.src="https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js",e.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(o))}(document);!function(e,t,n,c,o,a,f){e.fbq||(o=e.fbq=function(){o.callMethod?o.callMethod.apply(o,arguments):o.queue.push(arguments)},e._fbq||(e._fbq=o),o.push=o,o.loaded=!0,o.version="2.0",o.queue=[],(a=t.createElement(n)).async=!0,a.src="https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js",(f=t.getElementsByTagName(n)[0]).parentNode.insertBefore(a,f))}(window,document,"script"),fbq("init","798813320263950"),fbq("track","PageView");

Source Article

...

The Antioch police in-car video system will be upgraded and all department members equipped with body-worn cameras.

Village officials recently authorized the purchase, service, support and maintenance of an integrated squad car and body-worn camera system.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

An agreement with CDS Office Technologies includes the purchase of 30 cameras, installation of hardware and software, programming, setup and training.

Chief Geoff Guttschow said the new system represents an “ongoing commitment to transparency” by improving the way encounters with the public are documented. The system should be fully operational in spring.

Guttschow said all 12 patrol vehicles will be equipped with a forward facing dash camera and an internal rear passenger compartment camera.

All patrol officers, supervisors, detectives and command staff will be equipped with a body-worn camera, he added.

Antioch police have an authorized strength of 29.

The total cost is about $183,000, Guttschow said. It’s funded with a combination of general village funds, fees collected per state law from DUI convictions and a grant.

The department has been using squad dash cameras for 20 years. The current system, purchased around 2007, is no longer adequate and can’t be maintained or repaired, Guttschow added.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

During the 2020-21 village budget process, the consensus of elected officials, the community and officers was that body-worn cameras should be seriously considered, he said.

Options and features were researched and the Panasonic Arbitrator system was selected. The village board approved the agreement with CDS Nov. 9.

The decision was six years in the making for Trustee Ed Macek, who successfully advocated for cameras in parks and at village hall.

He said he donated $3,000 toward the new system, which will offer “three-tier protection” for the village, police and public.

“We just boosted our professionalism in Antioch,” Macek said.

Mayor Larry Hanson said it became clear video documentation protects the integrity of the police department and the public.

“Now you won’t have discrepancies unless the cameras fail,” Hanson said.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Body-worn cameras are in use in several agencies, including Lakemoor, Waukegan, Mundelein, Gurnee and the Lake County sheriff’s office, which began its program in early 2016.

“Body cameras are just another tool we’ll use to do our jobs,” said Round Lake Beach Police Chief Gilbert Rivera.

His department is reviewing its policies and procedures in advance of implementing the system, said Rivera, who serves as president of the Lake County Chiefs of Police Association.

In July, Vernon Hills equipped select officers with cameras to evaluate the system. As a result, the entire department was equipped and the program fully implemented in early October.

Similar to Antioch, the system is an expansion of the squad car cameras so the learning curve wasn’t too extreme and officers are responding well, said Jim Levicki, commander of administrative services.

He added that supervisors conduct random checks for policy compliance.

Body-worn cameras will be used to enhance training protocols,

…...

Berlin police say a car crashed into the front gate of the German chancellery building housing Angela Merkel’s offices on Wednesday morning but appears to have caused little damage.

Spokesman Hartmut Paeth said police are on the scene investigating the incident but had no details about injuries or arrests.

Rescue crews on the scene confirmed the man driving the car was being treated in an ambulance that remained in front of the chancellery.

GERMANY PROTESTERS CLASH WITH POLICE AMID GOVERNMENT CORONAVIRUS RESTRICTIONS

A car stands in front of the chancellery after it crashed into the front gate of the building housing German Chancellors Angela Merkel’s offices in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020. (Michael Kappeler/dpa via AP)

A car stands in front of the chancellery after it crashed into the front gate of the building housing German Chancellors Angela Merkel’s offices in Berlin, Germany, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020. (Michael Kappeler/dpa via AP)

The car, a Volkswagen sedan, had the slogan “You damned murderers of children and old people” scrawled in white paint on one side. On the other, it said, “stop the globalization policies.”

It had license plates from the North Rhine-Westphalia area of Lippe and was driven away by the Berlin fire department showing little sign of damage beyond a few scratches. The metal gate to the chancellery appeared slightly bent.

GERMAN AD THANKS COUCH POTATOES FOR STAYING AT HOME DURING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

There was no immediate indication of what prompted the incident, but it came on the day that Merkel was to meet with state governors to talk about extending a partial coronavirus shutdown that started on Nov. 2.

The government’s approach toward slowing the coronavirus pandemic and the restrictions enjoy widespread support among most Germans but they have also prompted occasionally violent protests in some major cities.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

It had license plates from the North Rhine-Westphalia area of Lippe and was driven away by the Berlin fire department showing little sign of damage. The metal gate to the chancellery appeared slightly bent.

Source Article

...

BERLIN (AP) – Berlin police say a car crashed into the front gate of the German chancellery building housing Angela Merkel’s offices on Wednesday morning but appears to have caused little damage.

Spokesman Hartmut Paeth said police are on the scene investigating the incident but had no details about injuries or arrests.

Rescue crews on the scene confirmed the man driving the car was being treated in an ambulance that remained in front of the chancellery.

The car, a Volkswagen sedan, had the slogan “You damned murderers of children and old people” scrawled in white paint on one side. On the other it said “stop the globalization policies.”

It had license plates from the North Rhine-Westphalia area of Lippe and was driven away by the Berlin fire department showing little sign of damage beyond a few scratches. The metal gate to the chancellery appeared slightly bent.

There was no immediate indication of what prompted the incident, but it came on the day that Merkel was to meet with state governors to talk about extending a partial coronavirus shutdown that started on Nov. 2.

The government’s approach toward slowing the coronavirus pandemic and the restrictions enjoy widespread support among most Germans but they have also prompted occasionally violent protests in some major cities.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Copyright © 2020 The Washington Times, LLC.

!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s){if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod? n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)};if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n; n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version='2.0';n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0; t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}(window, document,'script','https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js');

fbq('init', '329974197684672'); fbq('init', '450591302454597');

fbq('track', "PageView"); fbq('track', 'ViewContent');

fbq('trackSingle', '450591302454597' , 'Subscribe', {value: '0.00', currency: 'USD', predicted_ltv: '0.00'}); (function (d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.5"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

Source Article

...

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with new information from a Michigan State Police investigation.



a car parked on the side of a road: Police say 200-300 teens were involved in fights in Grand Rapids.


© KATHLEEN GALLIGAN, KATHLEEN GALLIGAN, Detroit Free
Police say 200-300 teens were involved in fights in Grand Rapids.

Michigan State Police troopers were investigating two possible freeway shootings in Detroit on Wednesday, one of which supposedly involved a U.S. Customs and Border Protection vehicle.

Loading...

Load Error

Officials from the State Police and U.S. Customs and Border Protection initially confirmed Wednesday that a vehicle occupied by customs officers was fired at Wednesday morning on Interstate 96 near the Southfield Freeway.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

But it turns out: it was just a rock that hit the passenger window as they drove, a State Police  investigation found. 

A real freeway shooting did happen in Detroit on Wednesday morning, though. It stemmed from a road rage incident that occurred at about 10:30 a.m. on westbound Interstate 94 near Interstate 75, according to State Police.  

In that incident, a female driver and male passenger engaged in a confrontation with a man driving a blue minivan. The suspect in the minivan fired shots with a handgun at the victims, striking the vehicle they were in, according to the agency. 

No one was hurt in that incident and no suspect is in custody, police said. 

 Police temporarily closed the freeways in both incidents to conduct investigations.

More: Detroit City Council approves traffic camera expansion, gunshot detectors

More: John James concedes to Peters in Senate race 3 weeks after election

 State Police Lt. Mike Shaw said in October that there has been an increase in freeway shootings this year generally caused by the community forgetting how to deescalate situations without violence, potentially due to stress brought on by the pandemic.

 State Police Metro South Post Commander Lt. Jennifer Johnson said Wednesday that police have  seized 297 weapons on freeways in Wayne County so far this year. She said that is a substantial increase from this time last year, although last year’s statistics were not immediately available. 

“The freeway is a microcosm of crime going on everywhere in the city and county. We’ve seen an increase in shootings on and off the roadways,” Johnson said. 

Contact Omar Abdel-Baqui: [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @omarabdelb.

This article originally appeared on Detroit Free Press: Feds report that their vehicle was shot at in Detroit, police discover it was just a rock

Continue Reading

Source Article

...

The Los Angeles Police Commission ruled Tuesday that an LAPD sergeant acted within department policy when he fatally shot a 31-year-old man who was holding a bicycle part that resembled a handgun in Culver City in January.



a man standing in front of a building: The L.A. Police Commission ruled Tuesday that a sergeant's fatal shooting of 31-year-old Victor Valencia was justified. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)


© (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)
The L.A. Police Commission ruled Tuesday that a sergeant’s fatal shooting of 31-year-old Victor Valencia was justified. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

The unanimous decision, justifying the sergeant’s actions and clearing him of any punishment, came after family members of Victor Valencia told the commission during a virtual Zoom meeting that Valencia suffered from mental illness, was of little threat and deserved better.

“There’s other ways to go about things,” said Sara Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin. “What gave the reason for this officer to shoot down my cousin like he was nothing?”

Cervantes and another family member said that officers should be better trained to understand people with mental illness and see them as people deserving of compassion.

Commission President Eileen Decker told the family that the commission would hear all the evidence in the case and “adjudicate the case fairly and objectively in accordance with the law.”

The commission then went into closed session, where it agreed with recommendations from LAPD Chief Michel Moore and a separate panel that reviews police shootings that Sgt. Colin Langsdale, who shot Valencia, should receive a tactical debriefing but was otherwise in line with department policy and therefore justified in his actions.

Valencia’s killing has been protested by activists in the city who said Valencia did not have a gun and should not have been shot.

The commission’s ruling comes amid a broader discussion in L.A. about the role police should play in cases involving people suffering from mental illness, with activists and police agreeing that alternative mental health providers would be better equipped to respond to certain calls for help.

However, it’s likely the call that brought Langsdale to the Culver City street where Valencia was would elicit a police response regardless, given its nature.

According to a report Moore provided to the commission Tuesday, Langsdale responded to the area of South Sepulveda and South Venice boulevards about 12:45 p.m. Saturday after police received reports of a man with a gun — with one caller saying he was “waving it around.”

Langsdale did not have his body camera activated when he first arrived at the scene, according to police. Once he activated it, it captured Valencia already on the ground and Langsdale standing behind the open door of his police car, gun drawn.

Langsdale said he believed Valencia had a gun. Other witnesses at the scene said they also believed he had a gun. Surveillance footage from a local gas station released by police showed Valencia holding up the bicycle part and appearing agitated.

Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin, said she suffers from depression, and that L.A. needs more services and programs for people suffering from mental illness, and LAPD officers need far better training on how to interact

…...

The Los Angeles Police Commission ruled Tuesday that an LAPD sergeant acted within department policy when he fatally shot a 31-year-old man who was holding a bicycle part that resembled a handgun in Culver City in January.

The unanimous decision, justifying the sergeant’s actions and clearing him of any punishment, came after family members of Victor Valencia told the commission during a virtual Zoom meeting that Valencia suffered from mental illness, was of little threat and deserved better.

“There’s other ways to go about things,” said Sara Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin. “What gave the reason for this officer to shoot down my cousin like he was nothing?”

Cervantes and another family member said that officers should be better trained to understand people with mental illness and see them as people deserving of compassion.

Commission President Eileen Decker told the family that the commission would hear all the evidence in the case and “adjudicate the case fairly and objectively in accordance with the law.”

The commission then went into closed session, where it agreed with recommendations from LAPD Chief Michel Moore and a separate panel that reviews police shootings that Sgt. Colin Langsdale, who shot Valencia, should receive a tactical debriefing but was otherwise in line with department policy and therefore justified in his actions.

Valencia’s killing has been protested by activists in the city who said Valencia did not have a gun and should not have been shot.

The commission’s ruling comes amid a broader discussion in L.A. about the role police should play in cases involving people suffering from mental illness, with activists and police agreeing that alternative mental health providers would be better equipped to respond to certain calls for help.

However, it’s likely the call that brought Langsdale to the Culver City street where Valencia was would elicit a police response regardless, given its nature.

According to a report Moore provided to the commission Tuesday, Langsdale responded to the area of South Sepulveda and South Venice boulevards about 12:45 p.m. Saturday after police received reports of a man with a gun — with one caller saying he was “waving it around.”

Langsdale did not have his body camera activated when he first arrived at the scene, according to police. Once he activated it, it captured Valencia already on the ground and Langsdale standing behind the open door of his police car, gun drawn.

Langsdale said he believed Valencia had a gun. Other witnesses at the scene said they also believed he had a gun. Surveillance footage from a local gas station released by police showed Valencia holding up the bicycle part and appearing agitated.

Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin, said she suffers from depression, and that L.A. needs more services and programs for people suffering from mental illness, and LAPD officers need far better training on how to interact with people in the throes of a mental health crisis.

“They need to know how to deal with people with our state of minds,” she said. “It’s not our fault that

…...

story.lead_photo.captionPolice lights

Neighbor charged in theft of vehicle

Pulaski County deputies arrested and charged a Little Rock man in the theft of his neighbor’s vehicle Tuesday morning, according to an arrest report.

Derek Blasingame, 40, had asked his neighbor for a ride and was denied, then took his neighbor’s vehicle, which was parked in the driveway running, according to the report.

Blasingame later returned the vehicle while deputies were at the scene and was taken to the Pulaski County jail, where he was charged with felony theft of a motor vehicle, the report said.

[RELATED: Click here for interactive map + full coverage of crime in Little Rock » arkansasonline.com/lrcrime/]

Reported threats lead to North Little Rock arrest

Police arrested a North Little Rock man Monday after he threatened an employee of an apartment complex on West Fourth Street, according to an arrest report.

North Little Rock police responded to a disturbance call at 400 W. Fourth St. after James Bland, 67, threatened an employee because he was upset about maintenance issues at his apartment, the report said.

Bland had approached the employee and threatened to kill him, according to the report.

Officers charged Bland with felony terroristic threatening and transported him to the Pulaski County jail.

Cart pusher faces break-in charge

Police arrested Robert Hinson, 52, at 3901 E. Broadway in North Little Rock early Tuesday on charges of felony breaking or entering, misdemeanor resisting arrest and misdemeanor fleeing, according to an arrest report.

Police decided to do a property check at the location in North Little Rock after seeing a man pushing a shopping cart in the parking lot around 11 p.m. Monday. There, police found Hinson in a fenced-in compound, according to the report.

Hinson left the compound by going under a fence, ignoring police commands, according to the report. A police officer jumped the fence and chased Hinson down on foot, the report said.

Hinson was taken to the Pulaski County jail.

Man helped out

of home, into jail

A homeless man was arrested Monday after police found him in a Little Rock home.

Officers responded to a residential alarm at 1901 Fair Park Blvd. in Little Rock where they found Shane Kendle, 24, inside, according to an arrest report.

Kendle told police that he broke in and he needed help getting out, the report said. Police escorted Kendle out of the home and took him into custody, the report said.

Sponsor Content

Source Article

...

PARMA HEIGHTS, Ohio

Drug abuse, Snow Road: On Nov. 6, police observed a weaving 2008 Kia Sedona on Snow Road.

It turned out the Cleveland driver was swerving while drinking from an open container of alcohol.

During a search of the Kia, police not only found felony drugs, but it turned out the Sedona was reported stolen.

The driver was arrested for receiving stolen property. He was also cited for drug abuse and open container.

Stolen vehicle, Stumph Road: On Nov. 4, a Stumph Road resident called police after making a startling discovery — her 2014 Hyundai Elantra was missing.

An arriving officer talked to the resident, who had no idea who stole her Elantra. Police are investigating.

Theft by deception, N. Church Drive: On Nov. 6, a N. Church Drive resident called police after discovering he had been scammed out of $1,000 through a Facebook fraud. Police are investigating.

Assault, Oakwood Road: On Nov. 6, police were dispatched to an Oakwood Road residence regarding a man and woman loudly arguing outside.

An arriving officer located the couple. After investigating the incident, a Brunswick woman was arrested for assaulting a police officer.

Fleeing, W. 130th Street: On Nov. 7, police observed a Chevy driving recklessly on W. 130th Street.

When the officer attempted to pull over the vehicle, the driver sped away. The pursuit was terminated in Cleveland. Police are investigating.

Disturbing the peace, W. 130th Street: On Nov. 7, police were dispatched to a W. 130th Street parking lot regarding two men who were fighting.

An arriving officer located the aggressor, a Brook Park man who was arrested for disturbing the peace.

Suspicious vehicle, Pearl Road: On Nov. 8, police observed a 2020 Mazda CX-5 driving suspiciously on Pearl Road.

When the officer attempted to pull over the Mazda, the driver took off leading police in a pursuit, which was terminated for safety reasons. Police are investigating.

Warrant, N. Church Drive: On Nov. 8, a N. Church Drive resident called police about a man acting suspicious in the area.

An arriving officer located the Cleveland man, who was trespassing. Police later learned he had a warrant.

The man was arrested and held for transport. Also, the suspect had marijuana and drug paraphernalia. He was cited for drug abuse, possession of drug paraphernalia and trespassing.

Source Article

...