January 15, 2021

Part

The Los Angeles Police Commission ruled Tuesday that an LAPD sergeant acted within department policy when he fatally shot a 31-year-old man who was holding a bicycle part that resembled a handgun in Culver City in January.



a man standing in front of a building: The L.A. Police Commission ruled Tuesday that a sergeant's fatal shooting of 31-year-old Victor Valencia was justified. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)


© (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)
The L.A. Police Commission ruled Tuesday that a sergeant’s fatal shooting of 31-year-old Victor Valencia was justified. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

The unanimous decision, justifying the sergeant’s actions and clearing him of any punishment, came after family members of Victor Valencia told the commission during a virtual Zoom meeting that Valencia suffered from mental illness, was of little threat and deserved better.

“There’s other ways to go about things,” said Sara Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin. “What gave the reason for this officer to shoot down my cousin like he was nothing?”

Cervantes and another family member said that officers should be better trained to understand people with mental illness and see them as people deserving of compassion.

Commission President Eileen Decker told the family that the commission would hear all the evidence in the case and “adjudicate the case fairly and objectively in accordance with the law.”

The commission then went into closed session, where it agreed with recommendations from LAPD Chief Michel Moore and a separate panel that reviews police shootings that Sgt. Colin Langsdale, who shot Valencia, should receive a tactical debriefing but was otherwise in line with department policy and therefore justified in his actions.

Valencia’s killing has been protested by activists in the city who said Valencia did not have a gun and should not have been shot.

The commission’s ruling comes amid a broader discussion in L.A. about the role police should play in cases involving people suffering from mental illness, with activists and police agreeing that alternative mental health providers would be better equipped to respond to certain calls for help.

However, it’s likely the call that brought Langsdale to the Culver City street where Valencia was would elicit a police response regardless, given its nature.

According to a report Moore provided to the commission Tuesday, Langsdale responded to the area of South Sepulveda and South Venice boulevards about 12:45 p.m. Saturday after police received reports of a man with a gun — with one caller saying he was “waving it around.”

Langsdale did not have his body camera activated when he first arrived at the scene, according to police. Once he activated it, it captured Valencia already on the ground and Langsdale standing behind the open door of his police car, gun drawn.

Langsdale said he believed Valencia had a gun. Other witnesses at the scene said they also believed he had a gun. Surveillance footage from a local gas station released by police showed Valencia holding up the bicycle part and appearing agitated.

Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin, said she suffers from depression, and that L.A. needs more services and programs for people suffering from mental illness, and LAPD officers need far better training on how to interact

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The Los Angeles Police Commission ruled Tuesday that an LAPD sergeant acted within department policy when he fatally shot a 31-year-old man who was holding a bicycle part that resembled a handgun in Culver City in January.

The unanimous decision, justifying the sergeant’s actions and clearing him of any punishment, came after family members of Victor Valencia told the commission during a virtual Zoom meeting that Valencia suffered from mental illness, was of little threat and deserved better.

“There’s other ways to go about things,” said Sara Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin. “What gave the reason for this officer to shoot down my cousin like he was nothing?”

Cervantes and another family member said that officers should be better trained to understand people with mental illness and see them as people deserving of compassion.

Commission President Eileen Decker told the family that the commission would hear all the evidence in the case and “adjudicate the case fairly and objectively in accordance with the law.”

The commission then went into closed session, where it agreed with recommendations from LAPD Chief Michel Moore and a separate panel that reviews police shootings that Sgt. Colin Langsdale, who shot Valencia, should receive a tactical debriefing but was otherwise in line with department policy and therefore justified in his actions.

Valencia’s killing has been protested by activists in the city who said Valencia did not have a gun and should not have been shot.

The commission’s ruling comes amid a broader discussion in L.A. about the role police should play in cases involving people suffering from mental illness, with activists and police agreeing that alternative mental health providers would be better equipped to respond to certain calls for help.

However, it’s likely the call that brought Langsdale to the Culver City street where Valencia was would elicit a police response regardless, given its nature.

According to a report Moore provided to the commission Tuesday, Langsdale responded to the area of South Sepulveda and South Venice boulevards about 12:45 p.m. Saturday after police received reports of a man with a gun — with one caller saying he was “waving it around.”

Langsdale did not have his body camera activated when he first arrived at the scene, according to police. Once he activated it, it captured Valencia already on the ground and Langsdale standing behind the open door of his police car, gun drawn.

Langsdale said he believed Valencia had a gun. Other witnesses at the scene said they also believed he had a gun. Surveillance footage from a local gas station released by police showed Valencia holding up the bicycle part and appearing agitated.

Cervantes, Valencia’s cousin, said she suffers from depression, and that L.A. needs more services and programs for people suffering from mental illness, and LAPD officers need far better training on how to interact with people in the throes of a mental health crisis.

“They need to know how to deal with people with our state of minds,” she said. “It’s not our fault that

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHSTA) announced on Monday that General Motors must recall 5.9 million vehicles, after the safety administration denied the company’s petition to avoid the callback.

“NHTSA has denied General Motors’ petition for inconsequentiality regarding Takata air bags, which will compel GM to recall and repair passenger air bags in approximately 5.9 million vehicles,” the agency told Newsweek via email. “All Takata phase-stabilized ammonium nitrate (PSAN) inflators without a desiccant are under recall.”

According to the email, GM must recall trucks and SUVs made between 2007 and 2014 as they “are at risk of the same type of explosion after long-term exposure to high heat and humidity as other recalled Takata inflators.”

Drivers who want to check if their vehicle has been recalled can visit the NHSTA recall page, found here.

On the page, they’ll be prompted to enter their 17-digit vehicle identification number, or VIN.

To find it, the NHSTA page says, “Look on the lower left of your car’s windshield…Your VIN is also located on your car’s registration card, and it may be shown on your insurance card.”

Once the VIN number is entered, drivers will be able to find out if their vehicle was involved in the recall.

The General Motors world headquarters in September 2015 in Detroit. U.S. safety regulators announced Monday that GM must recall 5.9 million vehicles due to faulty airbags.
Bill Pugliano/Getty

GM urged the administration to avoid a recall several times dating back to 2016, saying that the measure was unnecessary because the airbags did not cause a safety risk.

The company directed Newsweek to a press release where it stated that it still believes “a recall of these vehicles is not warranted based on the factual and scientific record” but that “will abide by NHTSA’s decision and begin taking the necessary steps.”

The AP also reported that in securities filings, GM estimated that it would cost around $1.2 billion to replace the airbag inflators it previously avoided fixing.

The agency wrote:

The recalls are due to a design defect, whereby the propellant used in Takata’s airbag inflators degrades after long-term exposure to high humidity and temperature cycling. During air bag deployment, this propellant degradation can cause the inflator to over-pressurize, causing sharp metal fragments (like shrapnel) to penetrate the air bag and enter the vehicle compartment. To date, these rupturing Takata inflators have resulted in the deaths of 18 people across the United States and hundreds of injuries, including lacerations and other serious consequences to occupants’ face, neck, and chest areas.

Updated November 23, 11:58 a.m. ET, to include a response from GM.

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LONDON (AP) — Britain will ban the sale of new gasoline and diesel cars by 2030, a decade earlier than its previous commitment, the prime minister said Tuesday.

Boris Johnson made the pledge as part of plans for a “green industrial revolution” that he claims could create up to 250,000 jobs in energy, transport and technology.

READ MORE: U.K. becomes 5th country to exceed 50,000 coronavirus deaths

The government said sales of new gasoline and diesel cars and vans will end in 2030, though hybrid vehicles can be sold until 2035.

Automakers have expressed concern about the target, saying the previous goal of 2040 was already ambitious.

The government’s green plans also include investments in hydrogen energy and carbon capture technology, and an ambition to generate enough wind energy to power every home in the U.K. by 2030. To the chagrin of some environmentalists, plans also include a new generation of nuclear power plants.

The environmental push is part of Johnson’s efforts to move beyond the tremors of the coronavirus pandemic and Britain’s divisive exit from the European Union, and to bring new jobs to struggling former industrial regions of central and northern England.

“Although this year has taken a very different path to the one we expected, I haven’t lost sight of our ambitious plans to level up across the country,” Johnson said in a statement.

“Our green industrial revolution will be powered by the wind turbines of Scotland and the North East, propelled by the electric vehicles made in the Midlands and advanced by the latest technologies developed in Wales, so we can look ahead to a more prosperous, greener future.”

Johnson also has made a shared commitment to fighting climate change part of his pitch to Joe Biden as he seeks to convince the U.S. president-elect he is not a carbon copy of Donald Trump, who has downplayed the threat posed by global warming.

READ MORE: Uncertainty in UK over COVID-19, relationship with U.S.

The U.K. is due to host the COP26 global climate conference next year, after a 12-month delay because of the coronavirus pandemic. Britain has also pledged reduce its carbon emissions to net zero by 2050.

Rebecca Newsom of Greenpeace U.K. said the “landmark” announcement was a big step forward, although she regretted the inclusion of “speculative solutions, such as nuclear and hydrogen from fossil fuels, that will not be taking us to zero emissions anytime soon, if ever.”

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LONDON (AP) — Britain will ban the sale of new gasoline and diesel cars by 2030, a decade earlier than its previous commitment, the prime minister said Tuesday.

Boris Johnson made the pledge as part of plans for a “green industrial revolution” that he claims could create up to 250,000 jobs in energy, transport and technology.

The government said sales of new gasoline and diesel cars and vans will end in 2030, though hybrid vehicles can be sold until 2035.

Automakers have expressed concern about the target, saying the previous goal of 2040 was already ambitious.

The government’s green plans also include investments in hydrogen energy and carbon capture technology, and an ambition to generate enough wind energy to power every home in the U.K. by 2030. To the chagrin of some environmentalists, plans also include a new generation of nuclear power plants.

The environmental push is part of Johnson’s efforts to move beyond the tremors of the coronavirus pandemic and Britain’s divisive exit from the European Union, and to bring new jobs to struggling former industrial regions of central and northern England.

“Although this year has taken a very different path to the one we expected, I haven’t lost sight of our ambitious plans to level up across the country,” Johnson said in a statement.

“Our green industrial revolution will be powered by the wind turbines of Scotland and the North East, propelled by the electric vehicles made in the Midlands and advanced by the latest technologies developed in Wales, so we can look ahead to a more prosperous, greener future.”

Johnson also has made a shared commitment to fighting climate change part of his pitch to Joe Biden as he seeks to convince the U.S. president-elect he is not a carbon copy of Donald Trump, who has downplayed the threat posed by global warming.

The U.K. is due to host the COP26 global climate conference next year, after a 12-month delay because of the coronavirus pandemic. Britain has also pledged reduce its carbon emissions to net zero by 2050.

Rebecca Newsom of Greenpeace U.K. said the “landmark” announcement was a big step forward, although she regretted the inclusion of “speculative solutions, such as nuclear and hydrogen from fossil fuels, that will not be taking us to zero emissions anytime soon, if ever.”

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Carlsbad Boulevard, the nearly seven-mile stretch of road also known as old Highway 101 through Carlsbad, is about to get a third designation — U.S. Bicycle Route 95.

The recognition would make Carlsbad Boulevard part of a national network of routes intended to facilitate interstate travel by bicycle on roads and highways identified as suitable for cycling.

“Just like the interstate highway system, there is a U.S. bicycle route system,” said Kerry Irons of the Adventure Cycling Association. “It’s in the relatively early stage of development.”

Carlsbad will be the last city in San Diego County to approve the designation, Irons said. About 75 percent of the 1,000-mile route has been established from the California-Oregon border to the U.S. border with Mexico. Eventually, plans call for U.S. Bicycle Route 95 to extend to the Canadian border.

“The target audience here is long-distance travelers,” he said. Usually they are people who travel in small groups on bikes loaded with equipment, and who stop at motels or campsites along the way.

“It’s not perfect,” he said of the bike-route system. “If you want to ride the entire California coast, you are going to hit construction … there are places where traffic is heavy … and sometimes there are rough or sandy roads and people with dogs on leashes.”

East-West routes in the works include U.S. Route 50 from San Francisco through South Lake Tahoe and on through Nevada and Utah, and Route 66, which goes from Los Angeles through parts of Arizona and New Mexico.

The American Association of State Highways and Transportation Officials created the U.S. Bicycle Route System in the early 1980s. So far there are designated bicycle routes in 24 states, used for cross-country travel, regional touring and commuting.

“Bicycle tourism is a growing industry in North America,” Carlsbad Mayor Matt Hall said in a letter to Caltrans supporting the designation. “As a community, we stand to benefit from this opportunity both economically and from the health and environmental related benefits of encouraging bicycle travel in our region.”

The Carlsbad City Council is expected to approve a resolution authorizing the designation at its meeting Tuesday.

Cities that agree to the designation are not required to take any additional action. No additional route markings, such as signs or bike lane markings, are required.

Groups such as the Adventure Cycling Association and the California Bicycle Coalition publish maps of the routes.

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Are folding bicycles a good buy?

For anyone who enjoys riding a bicycle but lacks adequate storage space, a folding bicycle may be ideal. A folding bicycle can be kept in a car trunk, so the owner can stop and enjoy a ride anytime. People living in small apartments can keep a folding bicycle tucked away in a closet, away from pathways.

Many people fear that leaving a bicycle outside invites theft, no matter how well the bike is secured. Keeping a folding bike indoors solves that problem. People living in a boat or motor home can easily get around whenever they want, yet store the bike easily in minimal space.

There are several models of folding bicycles, most of them using smaller wheels than conventional bicycles. Usually, a long seat stem allows for a height comparable to bicycles that use standard 26-inch wheels. Most models fold in the middle, along the seat stem.

 
 


What are some bicycle safety rules for riding in the street with motor vehicles?

Riding a bike is beneficial because it is exercise, and it conserves fuel; however,it must be done in a safe manner. Knowing proper protocol while riding in the street with motor vehicles is a must.

-Ride in the street about 2 or 3 feet from the curb.
-Always use hand signals before turning or stopping.
-Always obey stoplights and signs.
-Ride in a straight line… no weaving.
-Make eye contact with other drivers before turning.
-Watch carefully for cars.

For more information on riding your bike safely, contact your local Department of Transportation and ask for their published bike safety guide.

 
 


What is the difference between a compact crankshaft and a normal one, and what does a compact one get you?

A bicycle’s crankshaft drives the chain of your bike as you pedal. Most bicycles come equipped with either a double or triple crankshaft. A triple crankshaft gives you a greater lower range of gears, allowing you to pedal uphill.

Compact crankshafts are not new, but are just coming into popularity. They also give you a better lower range, but take away a bit at the higher range, unlike the double or triple crankshaft. The upside is that it is lighter weight than even a standard double. The downside is that you don’t get as great a lower end as a triple would give you and you do lose that bit at the high end.

So, if you need better low end gears on your racer, but don’t need all that a triple would provide, a lighter, compact crankshaft could be your answer.

 
 


What is the winning purse for the winner of the tour de france?

Held every July, the Tour de France has long been thought of as the toughest of races. Just to compete in it is a triumph in and above itself. For the winner though, the purse of 2 million French francs is quite a reward. In American money, it equals about $600,000. This

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Transportation Research: Part A considers papers dealing with policy analysis (design, formulation and evaluation); planning; interaction with the political, socioeconomic and physical environments; and management and evaluation of transport systems. Topics may be approached from any discipline or perspective:…

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Transportation Research: Part A considers papers dealing with policy analysis (design, formulation and evaluation); planning; interaction with the political, socioeconomic and physical environments; and management and evaluation of transport systems. Topics may be approached from any discipline or perspective: economics, engineering, psychology, sociology, urbanism, etc., but must have a clear policy concern or be of interest for practice, and must be based on solid research and good quality data. The journal is international, and places equal emphasis on the problems of industrialized and non-industrialized regions.

Part A’s aims and scope are complementary to Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Part C: Emerging Technologies and Part D: Transport and Environment. Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review. Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour. The complete set forms the most cohesive and comprehensive reference of current research in transportation science.

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