December 1, 2020

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Dulles International Airport is expected to be a lot less busy this Thanksgiving.

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Despite officials and experts advising against it, some locals will still be traveling for Thanksgiving. And the region’s transportation agencies and companies are communicating a number of precautions and measures in hopes of keeping them healthy and safe from COVID-19 during what is typically the busiest travel period of the year.

At Reagan National Airport and Dulles International Airport (which are both run by the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority), face coverings are required at all times and complementary masks are available at information counters. The airports also have “thousands of social distancing stickers” on the floor to remind folks about staying separated.

There are also more than 700 hand-sanitizing stations throughout both airports.

However, unlike a number of others across the country, regional airports currently do not have any testing sites.

Amtrak is partnering with the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health on safety measures. Face masks are required at Union Station as well onboard throughout a train trip.

The train station also has social distancing stickers and the Amtrak website says cleanings are being done using EPA-registered disinfecting wipes. Boarding times are extended and fewer seats are being sold in order to reduce crowding. Additionally, on all Amtrak trains there are filtration systems that generate a full fresh air exchange every four to five minutes.

A majority of bus companies with local routes — Greyhound, Megabus, and Washington Deluxe — run out of a hub at Union Station. All are requiring face masks when boarding and walking around the bus, limiting the number of tickets sold, enhancing cleaning, and touting their air filtration systems. Greyhound, however, specifically notes that if you are unable (or unwilling) to wear a face covering, including due to a medical condition, they “regret that you will not be able to travel on Greyhound at this time.”

The bus company is also advertising that they are now “ozonate” each bus, which is a sanitation process more often used to prevent the spread of waterborne diseases. While studies are ongoing, some have determined the process to be “potentially useful” against the coronavirus.

As this has been a year like no other, it’s difficult to predict how many people will travel for the holiday. During a normal Thanksgiving week, a lot of people come and go in the D.C. region. Last year, it was estimated that nearly 1.35 million left town. About 100,000 locals flew and more than 105,000 train trips came through Union Station.

This year, the number will drop significantly. Air travel is expected to decline by nearly half nationwide compared to last year, according to AAA estimates. The number of people traveling by bus, train, and cruise is estimated to drop by more than 75% from last year’s level, due to the pandemic.

Earlier this month, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser instituted a travel advisory requiring those who are visiting D.C. or

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SAN ANTONIO – It seems there isn’t much folks can agree on in 2020, but a deep hatred of traffic is universal.

While our journalists can’t wave a magic wand to fix congestion on your daily drive, we want to do everything we can to make it a little easier and safer.

Of course, we have live traffic maps with the latest delays and closures on the KSAT traffic page, but we want to go deeper. To do that, we need your help.

What questions do you have about transportation issues around San Antonio and South Texas?

Maybe you’re curious about that seemingly empty park-and-ride in Stone Oak?

What would you like our journalists to dig into, from strange traffic laws to tips and tricks on the road?

How can we make your morning or afternoon commute a little more manageable? Let us know in the prompt below or in the comment section of this story.

Over the next few weeks, KSAT staff will be crawling over your responses to identify and report out issues facing our community, from traffic hacks to major road projects.

These stories will follow the two recent KSAT Explains episodes about San Antonio’s troubled mass transit past and what the future holds for transportation in our city.

READ MORE FROM KSAT:

Copyright 2020 by KSAT – All rights reserved.

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Updated 4:10 p.m.: Revised to include additional details about the accident.

A high-speed crash Friday night on Interstate 20 in southeast Dallas’ Rylie area left two people dead and two more hospitalized, a Dallas County sheriff’s spokesman said Saturday.

Raul Reyna said that around 9:25 p.m., a silver 2006 Chrysler Pacifica carrying four people rammed into a truck-mounted attenuator — a work-truck attachment designed to soften the impact of collisions. He said the truck “had just parked and was in the process of lowering the attenuator” when the crash occurred.

Sheriff’s deputies arrived shortly after to find the Pacifica, which was headed west on LBJ Freeway near Haymarket Road, engulfed in flames, Reyna said.

Several people stopped to help and check for survivors, Reyna said. They were able to pull out the vehicle’s two back-seat passengers, a 16-year-old girl and an 18-year-old woman whom Dallas Fire Rescue took to Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. Their conditions were unknown.

Bystanders were unable to rescue the car’s driver and front-seat passenger — a man whose age is unknown and a 41-year-old woman, Reyna said. Dallas Fire Rescue pronounced both dead at the scene at 9:46 p.m.

The identification of the victims or other information about them was not provided.

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A high-speed crash Friday night on Interstate 20 in Dallas’ Rylie area left two people dead and two more hospitalized, a Dallas County sheriff’s spokesman said Saturday.

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Sheriff’s spokesman Raul Reyna said that around 9:25 p.m., a silver 2006 Chrysler Pacifica carrying four people rammed into a truck-mounted attenuator — a work-truck attachment designed to soften the impact of collisions. Reyna said wasn’t sure whether the attenuator had been deployed properly at the time.

Sheriff’s deputies arrived shortly after to find the Pacifica, which was headed west on the LBJ Freeway near Haymarket Road, engulfed in flames, Reyna said.

Several people stopped to help and check for survivors, Reyna said. They were able to pull out vehicle’s two back-seat passengers, a 16-year-old girl and an 18-year-old woman who Dallas Fire Rescue took to Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas. Their conditions were not known.

Bystanders were unable to rescue the car’s driver and front-seat passenger — a man whose age is unknown and a 41-year-old woman, Reyna said. Dallas Fire Rescue pronounced both dead at the scene at 9:46 p.m.

The identification of the victims or other information about them was not provided.

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The Coatesville Area school board said Nov. 11 hybrid instruction — a plan which incorporates virtual and classroom instruction — is on hold for now due to transportation problems.

“Our community’s outrage is justified,” Superintendent Tomas Hanna said in a statement to the community.

Last month the Coatesville school board voted in favor of a hybrid plan set to begin Monday, Nov. 9. That never happened. Parents were notified by phone around 9 p.m. Sunday that the district didn’t have enough bus drivers, so students returned to virtual instruction via Chromebook Monday morning.

In a remote Nov. 10 school board meeting that lasted for more than three hours, board members faced scathing, lengthy public criticism about both the last-minute cancellation, for which both Hanna and board members profusely apologized.

Hanna explained Coatesville’s transportation department delivered bus schedules to Krapf at least a week late. Also, complex pandemic scheduling and the shortage of bus drivers Krapf faces in the pandemic made transportation impossible. There simply weren’t enough drivers to handle Coatesville’s bus routes. The cash-strapped district also has 15 fewer buses this school year because in the spring it cut $750,000 from its transportation budget.

Numerous private and charter school parents — for whom the district by law must provide transportation —also attended the remote meeting to complain about new bus routes. Those students have been bused since August. When the district cut bus routes it enacted a shuttle system, busing non-Coatesville students to transportation hubs and then shuttling groups to schools like Pope John Paul II and Collegium Charter.

Some parents complained there is no supervision at the hubs, their elementary children are now forced to endure two-hour bus rides, and that some buses never showed to pick up children or left students waiting at school for hours. One parent said current conditions border on child abuse. Parents also complained about a lack of communication from the district’s transportation department about bus issues.

Hanna said a transportation consultant is now at Coatesville working on the problem, and the district will soon have a transportation hotline to solve daily problems. As for when students might be able to return to classes, the answer is “as soon as possible.”

Some angry parents accused board members of trying to punish charter school families, but board President Robert Fisher said the board believes all parents have the right to choose an appropriate education for their children.

“The problem is the funding formula,” Fisher said.

Hanna said 37.66% of the district’s 2019-20 budget goes to support charter schools. However, citing Collegium Charter School as one example, Hanna said the district must pay $34,000 to send a special education student to Collegium, but Collegium spends just $11,581 on that student.

The Coatesville board said the charter school funding formula hasn’t been changed for 23 years and is unfair because it results in drastic overpayments to

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About the MPO

The Danville Area Transportation Study MPO leads in the development of the region’s long-range transportation plan and short-range transportation improvement program through a partnership among the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration, Illinois DOT, local elected leadership, local planning and urban services employees, the business community, and citizens across the Danville region. 

Our Mission

The Danville Area Transportation Study MPO is committed to providing leadership to the region in the planning, funding, and development of a regional multi-modal transportation system; one that promotes personal and social economic prosperity while encouraging sustainable growth and development practices to protect and preserve valuable community and natural assets.  

Our Committees

The Danville Area Transportation Study is comprised of two committees, the Technical Committee and the Policy Committee.

​The DATS committees include representatives from: the City of Danville, the City of Georgetown, the Village of Belgium, the Village of Westville, the Village of Catlin, Catlin Township, Danville Township, Newell Township, Georgetown Township, Vermilion County, Danville Mass Transit, CRIS, Vermilion Regional Airport, and the Illinois Department of Transportation.

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