Bicycles on Washington State Ferries (WSF)

bicycles offloading in Seattle

Riding your bike  (pdf 2.82 mb) with Washington State Ferries (WSF) means you get priority loading and unloading on most sailings. Coupled with the environmental, health and mobility benefits of biking, it’s no wonder approximately 280,000 people ride their bikes onto ferries each year. Whether you’re biking onto the ferry for the first time or are a seasoned rider, you’ll find a passionate community of cyclists and ferry staff to help you out. If you have questions not answered in this guide, don’t hesitate to ask a terminal staff member, your fellow commuter, or WSF staff at wsfinfo@wsdot.wa.gov .

Getting There
We recommend that bike passengers arrive 20 minutes prior to departure time to get priority loading. Late arrivals will be loaded after vehicles, although some routes allow for a mid-load during commuting hours. Please see below for terminal-specific information  on accessing the terminal, purchasing tickets, and bike parking.

Bike Parking
Most WSF terminals provide bike racks for your convenience. When bike parking is unavailable or bike racks are full, please be considerate of others in choosing where to stand with or park your bike while waiting for the ferry to arrive. Keep walkways, ramps, entrances, and the area around designated ADA parking spots clear.

Fares/Tickets

  • Bike passengers pay the standard walk-on passenger fare and are assessed a stowage surcharge of $1-4 depending on route (surcharge waived if using a multi-ride or ORCA card, except on Anacortes/San Juan Islands/Sidney B.C. routes).
  • Bikes with standard trailers do not pay an additional fare.
  • Bikes towing kayaks or canoes pay the motorcycle and driver fare.

Loading
Bike passengers will load onto the forward end of the car deck, unless otherwise instructed by deck crew. Bikes loaded after vehicles (late arrivals) must remain at the rear of the boat and are not permitted to maneuver between vehicles to get to the forward end of the car deck. If it does not interfere with deck operations, bikes may be secured to eyebolts on the bulkhead or to railings. Bikes must remain on the car deck at all times. Please take all personal belongings, including bike bags, with you if leaving your bike unattended during the sailing. Shoes with exposed cleats are not permitted in the passenger cabin.

Unloading
Bikes on the forward end of the car deck are unloaded ahead of vehicle traffic, except when otherwise directed by crewmembers. Those who do not return to their bikes in time to unload ahead of vehicles will unload last. Bikes at the rear end of the deck will unload after vehicles. Please exercise caution when unloading, especially when unloading with walk-on passengers.

Forgotten/Unattended Bicycles
Bikes may be left unattended during the sailing, so long as they are properly secured on the car deck. DO NOT disembark the ferry without your bike. Bikes left on the ferry causes a “Person Overboard” response by the U.S. Coast Guard – resulting in service delays and costly search and rescue operations.

Bike Share
Bike sharing is an increasingly popular mode of

Vehicle Classification Information – New York State Thruway

Vehicle Classification Information

Vehicle classification is based on the height of the vehicle over the first two axles and the total number of axles, including any towed vehicles or trailers.  Vehicles under 7 feet 6 inches in height are considered “LOW” (L).  Vehicles 7 feet 6 inches in height or greater are considered “HIGH” (H).

The total number of axles plus the height designation equals the vehicle class as shown in the table (Figure 1) below. The diagram (Figure 2) below shows approximate vehicle heights in relation to the toll booth. Diagram (Figure 3) below shows examples of axle counts on various vehicles.   Example: Most two-axle passenger vehicles are Class 2L.

Helpful information can also be found in the Frequently Asked Questions. (Discount applies to E-ZPassNY accounts only).

Figure 1 – Vehicle Class Table
Class Height Number of Axles E-ZPass* Discount
2L UNDER 7 feet 6 inches 2 5%
3L UNDER 7 feet 6 inches 3 5%
4L UNDER 7 feet 6 inches 4 or more 5%
2H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 2 5%
3H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 3 5%
4H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 4 5%
5H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 5 5%
6H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 6 5%
7H 7 feet 6 inches OR GREATER 7 or more 5%

*Discount reflected in E-ZPass Toll Schedules


Figure 2 – Diagram showing approximate vehicle heights in relation to toll booth

Image showing examples of heights of vehicles


Figure 3 – Examples of axle counts on various vehicles

5 axle truck

5 axles

 

2 axle car

2 axles

 

3 axles total, 2 on car, 1 in tow

3 axles






Source Article

Unlawful Vehicle Modifications: State Laws

State Statute Alabama Regulation of Operation of Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(AL Code Title 32, Ch. 5, scroll to Article 9)
Window Tinting (AL Code Title 32, Ch. 5C)

Alaska

Vehicle Equipment Standards

(AK Statutes scroll to section 28.05.081)

Arizona Equipment

(ARS Title 28 scroll to 28-921 to 28-966)

Arkansas Size and Load Regulations

(AR Code Title 27, Ch. 35)
Equipment Regulations (AR Code Title 27, Ch. 37)

California Division 12 – Equipment of Vehicles (scroll down)

(California Vehicle Code)

Colorado Regulation of Vehicles and Traffic: Equipment

(CRS Title 42 scroll to 42-4-201 to 42-4-239)

Connecticut Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(GSC Ch. 246 scroll to section 14-80 to 14-106)

Delaware Equipment Requirements

(DE Code Title 21, Ch. 43, Subchapter I)
Lights (DE Code Title 21, Ch. 43, Subchapter II)

District of Columbia

D.C. Vehicle Code (scroll to Title 50)

Florida State Uniform Traffic Control: Equipment

(FS Ch. 316 scroll to 316.217 to 316.455)

Georgia Vehicles and equipment

(Georgia Code §sect; 40-8-7 to 40-8-90)

Hawaii Street rod vehicle requirements

(HRS section 286-26.5)

Idaho Vehicle Equipment

(ID Statutes Title 49, Ch. 9)

Illinois Equipment of Vehicles

(625 ILCS 5, Chapter 12)

Indiana Motor Vehicle Equipment

(Indiana Code Title 9, Article 19)

Iowa Vehicle Equipment

(IA Code Ch. 321 scroll to 321.384 to 321.481 )

Kansas Equipment of Vehicles

(KS Statutes Ch. 8, Article 17)

Kentucky Vehicle Equipment

(KRS Chapter 189 scroll to sections .020 to .205)

Louisiana Motor Vehicles and Traffic Regulation: Equipment

(LRS Title 32 scroll to 32:301 to 32:369)
Low rider vehicles (LRS 32:297)
Proper equipment required on vehicles (LRS 32:53)

Maine Equipment

(MRS Title 29-A Chapter 17)

Maryland Equipment of Vehicles

(MD Transp. Code Title 22)

Massachusetts Operation of unregistered or improperly equipped motor vehicles

(90 MGL section 9)

Michigan Equipment

(MI Vehicle Code sections 257.683 to 257.711)
After-Market Lighting [PDF] (MI State Police)

Minnesota Traffic Regulations: Equipment

(MN Statutes Ch. 169; scroll to 169.47 to 169.75)

Mississippi Equipment and Identification

(MS Code Title 63, Ch. 7)

Missouri Vehicle Equipment Regulations

(MRS Chapter 307)

Montana Vehicle Equipment

(MCA Title 61, Ch. 9)

Nebraska Vehicle equipment and violations

(R.R.S. Nebr. § 60-6, 220 et al.)

Nevada Equipment of Vehicles

(NRS 484.541 to 484.646)

New Hampshire Equipment of Vehicles

(NH Statutes Ch. 266)

New Jersey Motor vehicle equipment

(NJ Statutes 39:3-46 to 39:3-84)

New Mexico Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(NMS Ch. 66, Article 3 scroll to Part 9)

New York Equipment of Motor Vehicles and Motorcycles

(NY Vehicle & Traffic Code Article 9)

North Carolina Motor Vehicle Act: Equipment

(NCGS Ch. 20, Article 3 scroll to sections 20-122 to 20-137)

North Dakota Equipment of Vehicles

[PDF] (ND Code Chapter 39-21)
Size, Width, and Height Restrictions [PDF] (ND Code Chapter 39-12)

Ohio Traffic Laws: Equipment

(ORC Chapter 4513)

Oklahoma Vehicle equipment

(OK Statutes Title 47 scroll to 47-12-101)

Oregon Vehicle Equipment Generally

[PDF] (OR Vehicle Code Ch. 815)
Vehicle Equipment Lights [PDF] (OR Vehicle Code Ch. 816)

Pennsylvania Equipment Standards

[PDF] (PA Vehicle Code Ch. 41)
Lighting Equipment [PDF] (PA Vehicle Code Ch. 43)
Other

State Efforts To Promote Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

USA FlagForty-five states and the District of Columbia provide an incentive for certain hybrid and/or electric vehicles, either through a specific utility operating in the state or through state legislation. The incentives range from tax credits or rebates to fleet acquisition goals, exemptions from emissions testing or utility time-of-use rate reductions. The five gray colored states do not have any laws or policies in place that would specifically impact the buying of an electric vehicle or the building of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). In addition, 20 states have enacted legislation to implement a special registration fee on alternatively fueled or electric vehicles. All fees are in addition to the standard registration fees.

Additional maps comparing specific state incentives are displayed at the bottom of the page.

 Alabama

AL flag

Charging Rate Incentive: Alabama Power offers a residential PEV rate for customers who verify possession of a qualified PEV and a Business Electric Vehicle Time-of-Use (BEVT) rate for electricity purchased to charge PEVs used for fleet purposes. The electricity used for vehicle charging is metered separately from all other electricity use.

Arizona

AZ flagAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Parking Incentive: An individual driving a dedicated AFV may park without penalty in parking areas that are designated for carpool operators, provided the vehicle is using alternative fuel. Recognized alternative fuels include propane, natural gas, electricity, hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen with propane or natural gas.

AFV Use Tax Exemption: S.B. 1413 (2014) exempts certain alternative fuels such as natural gas, electricity, propane, and hydrogen from the state use tax.

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Tax Credit: A tax credit of up to $75 is available to individuals for the installation of EV charging outlets in a house or housing unit built by the individual.

HOV Lane Exemption: Qualified alternative fuel vehicles may use designated HOV lanes regardless of the number of occupants in the vehicle.

Joint Use of Government Fueling Infrastructure: To the extent practical, an Arizona state agency or political subdivision that operates an alternative fueling station must allow vehicles, other state agencies or political subdivisions own or operate to fuel at the station. For the purpose of this requirement, alternative fuels include propane, natural gas, electricity, hydrogen, and a blend of hydrogen with propane or natural gas.

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging Rates:  The Salt River Project offers an experimental reduced rate time-of-use plan for certain plug-in hybrid and electric vehicle owners.

Reduced AFV License Tax: The vehicle license tax for an AFV is $4 for every $100 in assessed value. During the first year after initial registration, the AFV ‘s assessed value is 1 percent of the manufacturer’s base retail price (compared to 60 percent for conventional vehicles). For each succeeding year, the original value of the AFV is reduced by 15 percent. The minimum amount of the annual AFV license tax is $5. For the purpose of this tax, AFVs include those powered exclusively by propane, natural gas, electricity, hydrogen, or a blend of hydrogen with propane or natural gas.

Vehicle Emissions

State of Rhode Island: Division of Motor Vehicles:

All DMV satellite offices are closed.

All road tests have been cancelled through Friday, May 8, 2020.

The Division of Motor Vehicles is temporarily waiving the requirement for a VIN check on out of state titles to be conducted by your local police station. The VIN will be electronically verified at the time of titling.

To ensure customers are not penalized for the actions we are taking to further protect health and safety, the DMV will be extending driver licenses, learner permits, ID’s, CLPs, CDLs, registrations, inspection stickers, and disability placards scheduled to expire in the months of March, April, or May 2020 by 90 days.

For further details about the expiration date extension please click here.

The Cranston DMV will be providing the following limited services and transactions.

  • Driver license, learner permit, State ID – Reservation Only
  • Vehicle Registration and Title – Reservation Only
  • Adjudication – Reservation Only
  • Commercial driver licenses and permits – Reservation Only
  • Dealer services – Drop Off and Checks Only

Make a Reservation for DMV services

PLEASE NOTE: DUE TO THE COVID-19 CRISIS, RESERVATIONS ARE ONLY MADE AVAILABLE THREE DAYS IN ADVANCE – EXCEPT FOR ADJUDICATION.

FOR EVERYONE’S HEALTH AND SAFETY, A FACE COVERING OR MASK MUST BE WORN AT ALL TIMES DURING YOUR VISIT.

 

Fatality Facts 2018State by state

Overview

The number and types of motor vehicle crash deaths differ widely among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. A state’s population has an obvious effect on the number of motor vehicle deaths. Fatality rates per capita and per vehicle miles traveled provide a way of examining motor vehicle deaths relative to the population and amount of driving. However, many factors can affect these rates, including types of vehicles driven, travel speeds, rates of licensure, state traffic laws, emergency care capabilities, weather, and topography.

The following facts are based on analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS).

Posted December 2019.


Fatal crash totals

There were 33,654 fatal motor vehicle crashes in the United States in 2018 in which 36,560 deaths occurred. This resulted in 11.2 deaths per 100,000 people and 1.13 deaths per 100 million miles traveled. The fatality rate per 100,000 people ranged from 4.4 in the District of Columbia to 22.2 in Mississippi. The death rate per 100 million miles traveled ranged from 0.54 in Massachusetts to 1.83 in South Carolina.





















Population, fatal motor vehicle crashes, motor vehicle crash deaths and motor vehicle crash death rates per state, 2018
State Population Vehicle miles traveled (millions) Fatal crashes Deaths Deaths per 100,000 population Deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled
Alabama 4,887,871 71,167 876 953 19.5 1.34
Alaska 737,438 5,487 69 80 10.8 1.46
Arizona 7,171,646 66,145 916 1,010 14.1 1.53
Arkansas 3,013,825 36,675 472 516 17.1 1.41
California 39,557,045 348,796 3,259 3,563 9.0 1.02
Colorado 5,695,564 53,954 588 632 11.1 1.17
Connecticut 3,572,665 31,596 276 294 8.2 0.93
Delaware 967,171 10,179 104 111 11.5 1.09
District of Columbia 702,455 3,691 30 31 4.4 0.84
Florida 21,299,325 221,816 2,915 3,133 14.7 1.41
Georgia 10,519,475 131,456 1,407 1,504 14.3 1.14
Hawaii 1,420,491 10,887 110 117 8.2 1.07
Idaho 1,754,208 17,709 212 231 13.2 1.30
Illinois 12,741,080 107,954 948 1,031 8.1 0.96
Indiana 6,691,878 81,529 774 858 12.8 1.05
Iowa 3,156,145 33,282 291 318 10.1 0.96
Kansas 2,911,505 32,190 366 404 13.9 1.26
Kentucky 4,468,402 49,544 664 724 16.2 1.46
Louisiana 4,659,978 50,045 716 768 16.5

State Electric Bicycle Laws | A Legislative Primer

Introduction

women with purse and electric bikeThe past few years have seen a marked increase in the number of electric bicycles (or “e-bikes”) in the U.S.

This primer deals specifically with low-speed electric bicycles as defined by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. E-bikes are most frequently “pedal-assist” or “muscle-assist,” meaning the rider must be pedaling for the electric motor to engage. E-bikes may also come equipped with a throttle that allows the bike to be propelled without pedaling.

The bicycle’s low-speed electric motor provides a boost of power to climb hills, extend the range of trips where a bicycle can be used, allow current bicycle users to bike more often and farther, provide a new recreation option for people who want to bike and in general, extend the range of any ride.

Low-speed e-bikes are as safe and sturdy as traditional bicycles and move at speeds similar to conventional bikes. E-bikes are emissions-free, low impact and operate silently. E-bikes vary widely in terms of shape and size, but the different types closely align with those of regular bicycles. E-bikes resemble traditional bicycles in both appearance and operation and do not function similarly to mopeds, scooters and other motorized vehicles.

According to a 2018 bicycle industry analysis, e-bikes sales increased 83 percent between May of 2017 and May of 2018, and e-bikes made up 10 percent of overall bikes sales in the U.S. for that time period. While the Asian and European e-bike markets are more robust, industry advocates hope to continue to expand U.S. e-bike sales.. Most major U.S. bicycle brands sell e-bikes, and bicycle manufacturers have moved or are positioning themselves to move to the U.S. to capitalize on the growing market.

Electric bicycles cost on average $2,000 – $3,000, versus a $1,000 average investment for a mid-range traditional commuter bicycle. An investment in an electric bicycle is appealing to those who are looking to replace short trips typically made by car, therefore the investment can be justified if the buyer factors in the reduced cost of car maintenance and fuel.  

Reasons for purchasing an e-bike vary, with some looking for a cheap commuting mode and others looking for a less physically demanding bicycle option or help bicycling through hilly areas. E-bikes may also provide a more attractive and feasible choice to take short trips. According to U.S. Department of Transportation survey data, half of all trips in the U.S. are three miles or less in length, a distance widely regarded as bikeable for most adults and even more feasible for electric bicycle riders. Seventy-two percent of those trips are currently made by cars and fewer than 2 percent by bicycle. E-bikes also provide a new transportation and recreation option for people with disabilities and those with physical limitations.

E-bikes have even been embraced by the nation’s rapidly expanding bike-share systems. In 2011, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville launched the country’s first electric bicycle sharing system, with two bike-share stations on their campus. In 2015, Birmingham, Ala., unveiled a citywide bike-share

Buying and Maintaining a Car | State of California – Department of Justice

Buying and Maintaining a Car

Buying a car – whether new or used – is one of the biggest purchases we make. It is important to take your time in deciding which car to buy and not be pressured by anyone who simply wants your money or your signature on a contract. Once you decide on the vehicle that best fits your needs and budget, shop around for the best price, know the vehicle’s history (if used), and be prepared to walk away from the deal if your questions are not being answered. Before you buy or lease a vehicle:

  • Know the value of the vehicle by checking vehicle pricing guides, newspaper ads, the Internet, or by comparison shopping. Popular publications include the National Automobile Dealers Association’s (NADA) Guides, Edmunds, Kelley Blue Book, and Consumer Reports. Some may charge for this information.
  • Always read and understand your purchase contract. Carefully review the vehicle’s price, fees, and finance charges. Don’t sign anything you don’t understand.
  • Make sure you understand the manufacturer’s warranty or any extended warranties offered by the dealer at extra cost. Because the cost of an extended warranty can be expensive, you should find out what it covers before you buy it.
  • When getting a loan, compare interest rates. You may pay more money when a dealer obtains a loan on your behalf than if you go directly to a bank or lender.
  • Protect yourself from fraud and unsafe used vehicles. The National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) provides important information about a used vehicle’s history. You can obtain a NMVTIS report at www.vehiclehistory.gov. Licensed dealers selling used cars must have a NMVTIS report to show you.
  • Understand the restrictions when buying an out of state vehicle: the car must be certified to meet California smog laws to be registered in California. See Buying an Out of State Vehicle on the California DMV website.
  • Find out if a vehicle has a safety recall notice and whether it has been repaired by checking the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Center for Auto Safety websites.

Car Buyer’s Bill of Rights

The Car Buyer’s Bill of Rights gives you certain protections when you buy a new or used vehicle from a licensed California dealer:

  • Buyer Disclosures. No charges may be added to your contract without full disclosure and your consent. Dealers must give you an itemized price list for optional “add-on” items such as service contracts, insurance, anti-theft devices, or other products.
  • Credit Score Disclosures. If you are obtaining financing from the dealer, the dealer must provide you with your credit score and a written explanation of how it is used.
  • Limit on Markups. When a dealer obtains financing on your behalf, it sometimes adds a hidden markup to increase the interest rate on your loan. The law caps the amount of compensation a dealer can receive from the lender.
  • Certified Used Cars. Used cars advertised as “certified” must meet specific requirements. Dealers must perform a complete vehicle inspection and

Vehicle Tax Exemption – United States Department of State

The Office of Foreign Missions (OFM) enforces the exemption of eligible foreign missions and their members from payment of any taxes when purchasing, leasing, registering or titling a vehicle. The following procedures are associated with requesting and obtaining a tax exemption on purchases or leases of official or personal motor vehicles by eligible foreign missions and their members in the United States. A “motor vehicle” is defined as any self-propelled vehicle, including but not limited to automobiles, motorcycles, boats, and aircraft.

The exemption of sales and use taxes imposed on purchases or leases of motor vehicles in the United States on the basis of the diplomatic or consular status or accreditation of the purchasing foreign mission or accredited mission member and their dependents is solely authorized via the issuance of a Motor Vehicle Tax-Exemption Letter by the Department’s Office of Foreign Missions (OFM) to the seller or lessor of such motor vehicle. Note that Diplomatic Tax Exemption Cards are not valid for exemption from taxes imposed on purchases of motor vehicles.

Therefore, prior to finalizing a purchase or lease of a motor vehicle, all foreign missions and their accredited members must instruct the seller/lessor to directly contact OFM during normal business hours to request the issuance of a Motor Vehicle Tax-Exemption Letter.

Motor vehicle sellers/lessors may make such requests by electronic mail or telephone.

Sellers/lessors in Maryland, Virginia, or the District of Columbia should direct requests to OFMTaxCustoms@state.gov. Sellers/lessors outside this area should direct requests to the nearest OFM Regional Office:

Sellers/lessors must provide the following information to OFM:

1. The seller/lessor’s name, mailing address, and telephone and fax numbers;

2. The color, year, make, and model of the motor vehicle that the mission or accredited mission member is planning to acquire; and

3. For official motor vehicles: the name of the foreign mission that is purchasing or leasing a motor vehicle; or

4. For personal motor vehicles: the name (as it appears on their current “A or G series” visa) of the accredited mission member or their dependent who is purchasing or leasing a motor vehicle, the name of the foreign mission to which the individual is assigned, and the individual’s Department-issued Personal Identification Number (PID). (Note that individuals must present proof of accreditation to the seller/lessor – i.e., valid passport which contains their current “A or G series” visa, or Department-issued protocol identification card, or Department-issued driver’s license, or Department-issued Diplomatic Tax Exemption Card.)

OFM strives to transmit Motor Vehicle Tax-Exemption Letters to the requesting seller/lessor by either electronic mail or facsimile within two hours of receiving the request.

Sellers/lessors are required to send all original ownership documents directly to OFM so that the motor vehicle can be properly registered and titled. Auto dealerships and state motor vehicle administrations should treat this transaction as an out of state registration. OFM will issue a registration card and federal license plates once proper documentation is received. Also, a title will be sent to the indicated lien holder to protect