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VinCheck.Info’s vehicle history report covers a range of topics that buyer’s need. It includes vehicle description or specs, theft/accident/damage/sales records, warranty, and other information. VinCheck.info compiles data a network of government, non-government, and auto industry sources. Access our comprehensive database to get a full vehicle history report using our free VIN check. You can also quickly decode your VIN using our Free VIN decoder tool. Don’t have the VIN? No worries. Run our free license plate lookup tool to get the same full report.

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Why Do I Need a Free Vehicle History Report?

VinCheck.info can help a used car buyer make an informed decision. We sift through tons of data to give you details you can use to evaluate any car:

  1.   Vehicle Specifications:
  • year of build
  • color
  • technical features
  • optional equipment installed, and more.

Compare and contrast the details provided to you by the seller with what the vehicle history report provides.

  1.    Safety Ratings: (IIHS test results)
  • crash-worthiness (how well does the vehicle protect its occupants in a crash)
  • crash avoidance and mitigation (available technology to  prevent a crash or lessen its severity)
  1.   Market Value: the estimated average value people are paying for the same car in your area.

This is a valuable tool for finding out the car’s worth to help you negotiate for a fair price.

4.   Fuel Efficiency: how far a car can travel on a specific amount of fuel.

This is important information at a time like this with unstable gas price and uncertain economy.  

5.    Warranty/Manufacturer Recall: warranty problems or recalls.

In most cases, dealerships offer recall repairs for free.

6.   Title Records:

  • Name of the state/city
  • Number of times the vehicle has been registered
  1.    Sales Records: listings of a vehicle for sale by a car dealership or a private party.

This information can help you find out the car’s price  in the previous sale.

8.   Lien Records: records of a claim to ownership of the vehicle by a finance company.

A lien on a vehicle means you have to pay the lien-holder first if you are going to buy it.

9.   Accident Records: minor and major accidents especially those covered by a police report.

  • Every year, the NHTSA reports close to six (6) million car accidents.
  • In 2016, fatal vehicle crashes led to 37,461 deaths.

Some cars sustain damages so extensive they become unsafe to ride. Make sure to buy a car with reliable and safe parts for the road.

10. Theft Records: reports of theft and theft recoveries from NICB (the federal crime bureau) and industry sources.

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History of the Bicycle

A modern bicycle by definition is a rider-powered vehicle with two wheels in tandem, powered by the rider turning pedals connected to the rear wheel by a chain, and having handlebars for steering and a saddle-like seat for the rider. With that definition in mind, let’s look at the history of early bicycles and the developments that led up to the modern bicycle.

Bicycle History in Debate

Up until a few years ago, most historians felt that Pierre and Ernest Michaux, the French father and son team of carriage-makers, invented the first bicycle during the 1860s. Historians now disagree since there is evidence that the bicycle and bicycle like vehicles are older than that. Historians do agree that Ernest Michaux did invent a bicycle with pedal and rotary cranks in 1861. However, they disagree if Michaux made the very first bike with pedals.

Another fallacy in bicycle history is that Leonardo DaVinci sketched a design for a very modern looking bicycle in 1490. This has been proven to be untrue.

The Celerifere

The celerifere was an early bicycle precursor invented in 1790 by Frenchmen Comte Mede de Sivrac. It had no steering and no pedals but the celerifere did at least look somewhat like a bicycle. However, it had four wheels instead of two, and a seat. A rider would power forward by using their feet for a walking/running push-off and then glide on the celerifere.

The Steerable Laufmaschine

German Baron Karl Drais von Sauerbronn invented an improved two-wheel version of the celerifere, called the laufmaschine, a German word for “running machine.” The steerable laufmaschine was made entirely of wood and had no pedals. Hence, a rider would need to push his or her feet against the ground to make the machine go forward. Drais’ vehicle was first exhibited in Paris on April 6, 1818.

Velocipede

The laufmaschine was renamed the velocipede (Latin for fast foot) by French photographer and inventor Nicephore Niepce and soon became the popular name for all the bicycle-like inventions of the 1800s. Today, the term is used mainly to describe the various forerunners of the monowheel, the unicycle, the bicycle, the dicycle, the tricycle and the quadracycle developed between 1817 and 1880.

Mechanically Propelled

In 1839, Scottish inventor Kirkpatrick Macmillan devised a system of driving levers and pedals for velocipedes that allowed the rider to propel the machine with feet lifted off the ground. However, historians are now debating if Macmillan actually did invent the first pedaled velocipede, or whether it was just propaganda by British writers to discredit the following French version of events.

The first really popular and commercially successful velocipede design was invented by French blacksmith, Ernest Michaux in 1863. A simpler and more elegant solution than the Macmillan bicycle, Michaux’s design included rotary cranks and pedals mounted to the front wheel hub. In 1868, Michaux founded Michaux et Cie (Michaux and company), the first company to manufacture velocipedes with pedals commercially. 

Penny Farthing

The Penny Farthing is also referred to as

History of the bicycle – Wikipedia

1886 Swift Safety Bicycle

Vehicles for human transport that have two wheels and require balancing by the rider date back to the early 19th century. The first means of transport making use of two wheels arranged consecutively, and thus the archetype of the bicycle, was the German draisine dating back to 1817. The term bicycle was coined in France in the 1860s, and the descriptive title “penny farthing”, used to describe an “Ordinary Bicycle”, is a 19th-century term.

Earliest unverified bicycle[edit]

There are several early, but unverified claims for the invention of the bicycle.

A sketch from around 1500 AD is attributed to Gian Giacomo Caprotti, a pupil of Leonardo da Vinci, but it was described by Hans-Erhard Lessing in 1998 as a purposeful fraud.[1][2] However, the authenticity of the bicycle sketch is still vigorously maintained by followers of Prof. Augusto Marinoni, a lexicographer and philologist, who was entrusted by the Commissione Vinciana of Rome with the transcription of Leonardo’s Codex Atlanticus.[3][4]

Later, and equally unverified, is the contention that a certain “Comte de Sivrac” developed a célérifère in 1792, demonstrating it at the Palais-Royal in France. The célérifère supposedly had two wheels set on a rigid wooden frame and no steering, directional control being limited to that attainable by leaning.[5] A rider was said to have sat astride the machine and pushed it along using alternate feet. It is now thought that the two-wheeled célérifère never existed (though there were four-wheelers) and it was instead a misinterpretation by the well-known French journalist Louis Baudry de Saunier in 1891.[6][7]

19th century[edit]

1817 to 1819: the draisine or velocipede[edit]

Wooden draisine (around 1820), the earliest two-wheeler
Drais’ 1817 design made to measure

The first verifiable claim for a practically used bicycle belongs to German Baron Karl von Drais, a civil servant to the Grand Duke of Baden in Germany. Drais invented his Laufmaschine (German for “running machine”) in 1817, that was called Draisine (English) or draisienne (French) by the press. Karl von Drais patented this design in 1818, which was the first commercially successful two-wheeled, steerable, human-propelled machine, commonly called a velocipede, and nicknamed hobby-horse or dandy horse.[8] It was initially manufactured in Germany and France.

Hans-Erhard Lessing (Drais’ biographer) found from circumstantial evidence that Drais’ interest in finding an alternative to the horse was the starvation and death of horses caused by crop failure in 1816, the Year Without a Summer (following the volcanic eruption of Tambora in 1815).[9]

On his first reported ride from Mannheim on June 12, 1817, he covered 13 km (eight miles) in less than an hour.[10] Constructed almost entirely of wood, the draisine weighed 22 kg (48 pounds), had brass bushings within the wheel bearings, iron shod wheels, a rear-wheel brake and 152 mm

bicycle | Definition, History, Types, & Facts

Bicycle predecessors

Historians disagree about the invention of the bicycle, and many dates are challenged. It is most likely that no individual qualifies as the inventor and that the bicycle evolved through the efforts of many. Although Leonardo da Vinci was credited with having sketched a bicycle in 1492 in his Codex Atlanticus, the drawing was discovered to be a forgery added in the 1960s. Another presumed bicycle ancestor, the vélocifère, or célérifère, of the 1790s was a fast horse-drawn coach that is not considered to be a predecessor of the bicycle.


Draisiennes, hobby-horses, and other velocipedes

The first two-wheeled rider-propelled machine for which there is indisputable evidence was the draisienne, invented by Baron Karl von Drais de Sauerbrun of Germany. In 1817 he rode it for 14 km (9 miles), and the following year he exhibited it in Paris. Although von Drais called his device a Laufmaschine (“running machine”), draisienne and velocipede became more popular names. The machine was made of wood, and the seated rider propelled himself by paddling his feet against the ground. A balance board supported the rider’s arms. Although von Drais was granted patents, copies were soon being produced in other countries, including Great Britain, Austria, Italy, and the United States.

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Denis Johnson of London purchased a draisienne and patented an improved model in 1818 as the “pedestrian curricle.” The following year he produced more than 300, and they became commonly known as hobby-horses. They were very expensive, and many buyers were members of the nobility. Caricaturists called the devices “dandy horses,” and riders were sometimes jeered in public. The design raised health concerns, and riding proved impractical except on smooth roads. Johnson’s production ended after only six months. The brief draisienne–hobby-horse fad did not lead to sustained development of two-wheeled vehicles, but von Drais and Johnson established that the machines could remain balanced while in motion. For the next 40 years, most experimenters focused on human-powered three- and four-wheeled velocipedes.

Treadles and pedals: powered velocipedes

There is evidence that a small number of two-wheeled machines with rear treadle drives were built in southwestern Scotland during the early 1840s. Kirkpatrick Macmillan, a blacksmith of Dumfriesshire, is most often associated with these. He is said to have traveled 40 miles (64 km) to Glasgow in 1842, although documentation is problematic. Gavin Dalzell of Lesmahagow probably built a similar two-wheeled machine in the mid-1840s and is said to have operated it for many years. This may be the heavily restored machine in the Glasgow Museum of Transport. It has wooden wheels and iron rims. The rider’s feet swung treadles back and forth, moving a pair of rods connected to cranks on the rear wheels. Thomas McCall, another Scotsman, built similar machines in the late 1860s. Documents indicate that Alexandre Lefèbvre of Saint-Denis, France, built a two-wheeled velocipede powered by treadles connected to cranks on the rear wheel

The History Of Automotive Repairs

In case you are like lots of people, you are probably attempting to get your automobile audio electronics up to date in your vehicle. A service workshop, for instance, would possibly buy one hour from a technician for £10 and sell it to a customer for £40, and make a profit of £30. It ought to now be clear that labour utilisation has a direct bearing on how a lot gross profit is successfully produced from promoting the technician’s time, and what’s paid to the technician for not working.

Apparently all it’s important to do for any interval – a day, a week, a month or a year – is add up all of your labour sales and subtract all your technicians’ costs (including fundamental, bonus, extra time, holidays, sick, coaching, perks and National Insurance coverage) to arrive at your profit on labour.

Because the title suggests, seized automobile auctions supply vehicles that were seized by the federal government or the police due to some illegal activity. The labour gross profit is usually expressed as a share of labour gross sales, which on this example comes to eighty two% (£91,344 divided by £a hundred and ten,880 expressed as a share).

In truth, the automobile rental firm might not be notified that such a citation occurred in considered one of their vehicles. The fact a monetary statement exhibits a big internet working profit and a lot of autos bought will not be sufficient reply to reply why it is worthwhile.

They permit the individual to carry up the automobile for the aim of changing tires or doing a little emergency repairs on the car. It is no surprise that auto retailers are one of the largest consumers of the brand new software program accessible at the moment.…