Giant Bicycles – Woodinville & Westside Bicycle

Giant Escape 3

$420.00

What type of ride will you do today? Commute, fitness ride, weekend adventure? Here’s a bike that does all of the above. Escape is smooth, confident and flat-out fun.
With its lightweight ALUXX aluminum frame, confident handling and fast-rolling 700c wheels, Escape lets you ride any road or path in comfort and style. It’s a perfect choice for commuting, fitness riding, or just for fun. It’s designed with a flat handlebar and upright rider position, which gives it a confident, sporty feel that’s suitable for city streets or country roads. The frame features slick internal cable routing for a clean look, and it has rack and fender mounts so you can add accessories to make it fit your needs.
KEY PERFORMANCE FACTORS
Balanced and efficient
– Lightweight ALUXX frame, smooth-rolling 700c wheels, and confident upright positioning offer a balanced, efficient ride quality.
Versatile and capable
– A wide range of gears helps you increase your speed and tackle hills with more control.
Rugged reliability
– Puncture-resistant tires and integrated rack mounts keep you rolling on tough city streets and more adventurous rides.

Giant Revolt Advanced 2

$2,450.00

Almost anything goes in gravel racing and riding. It’s a mixed-up challenge of speed, endurance and handling. This high-performance all-rounder does it all. It’s smooth, it’s efficient, and it’s your new best friend for pushing limits on roads, gravel and dirt.
This high-performance all-rounder made a big splash with its 2018 debut, landing podium finishes at big-time gravel events including Grinduro and the unofficial “Gravel Worlds” in the U.S. It’s designed around a lightweight Advanced composite frameset with gravel-riding geometry, so you can tackle long, hard rides with greater control and less fatigue. A composite fork eats up bumps, and the D-Fuse seatpost and Contact XR D-Fuse handlebar absorb shocks and vibrations. The frame is integrated for disc brakes and has clearance for larger tires up to 45c so you can float through the rough stuff. Add in some clever frame details, including the X-Defender downtube protector and smart mount system for racks and accessories, and you have everything you need for your gravel adventures.
KEY PERFORMANCE FACTORS
Versatile gravel geometry
– All-new gravel-riding geometry features endurance positioning and shorter chainstays. The result is precise handling, agility and control in all situations, from out-of-the-saddle road climbs to fast and rugged dirt road descents.
Tuned compliance
– An innovative new Contact XR D-Fuse handlebar and D-Fuse seatpost work as a system to help absorb shock without sacrificing the stiffness needed for aggressive road performance. Added frame clearance for high-volume 45c tires help smooth out rough roads, gravel and dirt.
All-rounder efficiency
– Advanced composite frame maximizes pedaling power, giving Revolt Advanced a smooth, fast ride quality on variable riding surfaces.

Giant TCR Advanced 2

$1,735.00

Climb faster. Corner quicker. Break away from the pack. For all-around road racing performance, look no further.
The most efficient race bikes have the perfect balance of light weight, stiffness and smooth compliance on the road. The TCR Advanced delivers on all three, making it a

Best 30 Bicycle Shops in Los Angeles, CA with Reviews

YP – The Real Yellow PagesSM – helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business’s suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.

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Orange County Bicycle Service + Garage

We are excited to announce our next group of classes! Below are the list of classes being offered.  

Please call me at (949) 916-0960 to sign up,we are limiting all the classes to only 6 students per class so everyone has a work station and a bike stand. All classes will be booked on a first come, first served basis, so please sign up ASAP, classes are filling up quickly!

PLEASE NOTE: All class dates are tentative, must have 3 students pre-registered to greenlight the class. In the rare event that under 3 students fail to register for the class, we will keep all registered students informed of schedule change, and all students will be moved to the next scheduled class/ class series.

We encourage all students to bring the bike they own that either:
#1 They ride the most  
#2 Needs the most work    
OR
#3 All of the Above 

****Please let us know if you are planning on bringing in a single speed bike. For the Complete Bicycle Mechanic Series we recommend a geared bike.

Thank you,

Cory
Cory Clayton
OC Bike Garage
Owner
(949) 916-0960

Workshop Classes

The OC Bicycle Service & Garage’s workshop classes guarantee hands on, detailed classes. Each student will work using all the equipment and tools needed. Being a Park Tool Certified School, each student gets a certificate of completion with each class. Cory Clayton, chief instructor of the courses, will answer any and all of your questions and provide assistance throughout the course.

 Each student is provided a work station and stand. Best part about the class, you will learn using work stations you can come back to and use to work on your bike; familiarity is half the battle.

Requirements: BRING YOUR BIKE and a willingness to learn! You will get dirty, so please dress accordingly. No makeup classes are offered due to the intensity of the course, please make sure the class times fit your schedule. PLEASE NOTE:  DRESS WARM! Especially if you are taking one of the night courses.

If the course does not come with a Park Tool Repair Book, we strongly encourage all students to have one on hand. Having one of these is the best follow up reference guide. The book is also offered at a discounted price for students.

Things to consider: Tools are expensive, we like students to be aware of that fact so that you don’t get too shocked; However we have great deals on tools for students! This is also why we created three fully stocked work bench station rentals as a cost effective option.

Intro to Bicycle Mechanics,

Trailside/ Roadside Maintenance Safety & Repair

Who Will Benefit:
Beginner Mechanics
Any Cyclist

What You Will Learn

Have no knowledge of your bike? Want to learn what to do if something goes wrong while on your ride? This course will teach students, hands-on, how to check their bike before their ride, tire and tube repair, basic brake and derailleur adjustments, as well as

Bicycle Bike Cycling Riding Bicycling Tips Tricks FAQ by Jim Langley

CRANK (tips & tricks)

The illustrations for this section are among my favorites, because I love the concept that bicycles make it possible to pedal the earth. But the artist who did such a fine job fitting globes on the bike in the top ad also made an interesting mistake. . . . (more)

I named this page “Crank” because to crank means to push the pace. And here, you can have some fun and pick up some useful information in a big hurry by consuming the many bite-size bicycle tips and tricks. The links with white wings take you to bicycle tips sections; the ones with yellow wings take you to full-length stories. You can skim and scan, read just what you want and learn plenty. Be sure to also follow my fun Bicycle Beat blog and my popular Tech Talk column in RoadBikeRider.com. Also, my FAQ page at the link below answers lots of common questions.

Click on a title below to go to that page

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ProBicycle: Bicycle Advocacy BY Bicyclists

  Current Probicycle Site Picks  



 

  Current ProBicycle Cycling News  


 

 The ProBicycle Uticyclist Gallery  

It’s time to choose the future of American cycling

Toy Bicycle

Grouped with pedestrians as a Pedestrian-On-Wheels.

Separate, limited, dangerous, slow, substandard restricted system of lanes and paths.
 

Special classification of access, rights and rules.

Dangerous shared pedestrian paths.
 

Go somewhere to ride

Vehicular Cycling

Same rights and legal standing as every other vehicle operator.

Enforce safe sharable road design policies. Accommodation on every road. Sharable-width lanes, bikeable shoulders.

Same Roads – Same Rights – Same Rules

The safest form of recreational and utility cycling- by far.

Ride to go somewhere

 

Bicycle Traveler – a FREE bicycle touring magazine

The magazine

Bicycle Traveler was launched in 2011. We aimed to create a magazine that showcases bicycle travel and delves into why people dream of undertaking round-the-world tours.

BT’s carefully curated collection of articles and photographs are gathered from a diverse group of cycling enthusiasts worldwide. With the recent boom in bicycle touring, our magazine base has grown to more than 25,000 dedicated subscribers.

As BT begins its 9th year, we are more passionate than ever about publishing high-quality content that resonates with our adventure-minded readers and illustrates the wonderful world of two-wheeled travel.

Subscribe (it’s free!) so that you don’t miss out on future editions. We respect your privacy. You can unsubscribe at any time.

The people behind it

Grace Johnson is the founding editor and designer of Bicycle Traveler magazine. Photographer Paul Jeurissen runs the website and his cycle touring and bicycle culture images regularly appear in the publication.

They met on the Trans America bicycle trail in 1981 and since then have taken numerous bike trips, totaling more than 9 years over 5 continents. You can follow their two-wheeled travels at Impressions from Bicycle Travels.

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Bicycle Playing Cards – Vintage Back Designs

Vintage Back Designs of
Bicycle
Playing Cards

Bicycle
playing cards are probably the most recognizable brand of
playing cards in the world.  Although the average person probably
associates Bicycle brand playing cards with the famous “Rider Back” design, the United States
Playing Card
Company
, or “USPCC” (which produces the Bicycle brand)
actually
produced over 80 different back designs with the “Bicycle” name over
the first few decades of the brand’s existence.  The Rider Back
design is
obviously  the most familiar, having been in constant production
since
1887.  But this was actually the second design to carry the
“Bicycle” name; the first was the Old Fan
back design, which was first produced in 1885 (and recently revived to commemorate the 125th
anniversary of
the Bicycle brand).

Bicycle
playing cards were originally produced in red, blue, green, and
brown, but the green and brown decks were discontinued in 1927.

The
reader may observe that many of the designs were revised one or
more times and thus appear in multiple variants (e.g. Racer
Back No. 1
, Racer Back No. 2).  This
usually happened for one of two key reasons.  First, many of the
earliest
designs were “one-way” backs, i.e. the backs were asymmetrical. For
instance, several different backs contain a three-pronged wing in the
middle of
the card that can be oriented in 2 different ways.  In the early
1900’s,
most of these were revised to a four-pronged wing design to render the
backs
symmetrical.  (The one notable exception is the League
back, which was first printed in 1893 and is the only back to retain a
three-pronged wing.  It also appears that this back has never gone
out of
production, and is still a favorite among magicians because of its
asymmetry.)  Second, the USPCC tried to keep up with the times, so
it
periodically updated the decks to reflect newer designs in bicycles,
automobiles, and motorcycles.

Indeed,
it was the attempt to be trendy that launched the Bicycle line
in the first place.  According to company lore, in the early 1880’s, cycling — on
unicycles,
bicycles, and tricycles — was taking the country by storm.  It was
also
around this time that Russell & Morgan, the forerunners of the
United
States Playing Card Company, decided to produce a new line of cards and
asked
employees to suggest an attractive name for the new product.  In
light of
the cycling craze, a printer, “Gus” Berens, offered the suggestion
“Bicycle.”
His idea was enthusiastically accepted, and the company has been
producing the Bicycle
brand of cards ever since.

In the
past decade, the USPCC has begun to capitalize on the Bicycle
brand’s rich history, issuing a commemorative “Vintage
Design Series
” in 2006 and a more limited “Heritage
Design Series
” in 2010 and 2011, each of which featured re-printings of a
number of the old back designs.  The Bicycle brand has also been
looking to the
future in recent years, partnering with magic companies and other
entities to
produce

The Bicycle as a System

The Bicycle as a System

Purpose

To explore the nature of systems by examining the systems that make a bicycle work. Students will begin to understand how the different systems of a bicycle relate to each other and be able to identify the properties of each part or subsystem.


Context

This lesson gives students an opportunity to examine the nature of systems in the context of an object with which they are very familiar – the bicycle. While this lesson is intended for grades 6-8, it presents concepts that are more appropriate for 7th and 8th grade students.

The main goal of having students learn about systems is not to have them talk about systems in abstract terms, but to enhance their ability (and inclination) to identify the various aspects of systems in attempting to understand the whole system. Examining systems is really a way of thinking rather than theories or discoveries.

Students will identify the properties of the various subsystems of a bicycle and examine how they relate to the whole. According to research: “Children tend to think of the properties of a system as belonging to individual parts of it rather than as arising from the interaction of the parts. A system property that arises from interaction of parts is therefore a difficult idea.” (Benchmarks for Science Literacy, p. 262.)

Students should already know that if something consists of many parts, the parts usually influence one another. Also they should be aware that something may not work as well (or at all) if a part of it is missing, broken, worn out, mismatched, or misconnected.

It is important to establish the boundary of the system to include enough parts so that their relationship to one another makes sense. Drawing the boundary of a system well can make the difference between understanding and not understanding what is going on. Thinking of everything within some boundary as being a system suggests the need to look for certain kinds of influence and behavior. For example, students should consider a system’s inputs and outputs-the outputs of some parts being inputs for others.

Systems are not mutually exclusive. Systems may be so closely related that there is no way to draw boundaries that separate all parts of one from all parts of the other. Any part of a system may itself be considered as a system-a subsystem-with its own internal parts and interactions. Any system is likely to be part of a larger system that it influences and that influences it. The idea of a system should be expanded to include connections among systems.

Students will also learn about the choices and constraints that go into the design of a bicycle system. Depending on whether the bicycle is intended for racing, mountain roads, or touring, influences its design and such choices as the type of tires, frame and materials, and drives and gears. In addition, accommodating one constraint can often lead to conflict with others. For example, the lightest material may not be the strongest, or

Bicycle, Bicycle Tips, Bicycle Part Tips


Are folding bicycles a good buy?

For anyone who enjoys riding a bicycle but lacks adequate storage space, a folding bicycle may be ideal. A folding bicycle can be kept in a car trunk, so the owner can stop and enjoy a ride anytime. People living in small apartments can keep a folding bicycle tucked away in a closet, away from pathways.

Many people fear that leaving a bicycle outside invites theft, no matter how well the bike is secured. Keeping a folding bike indoors solves that problem. People living in a boat or motor home can easily get around whenever they want, yet store the bike easily in minimal space.

There are several models of folding bicycles, most of them using smaller wheels than conventional bicycles. Usually, a long seat stem allows for a height comparable to bicycles that use standard 26-inch wheels. Most models fold in the middle, along the seat stem.

 
 


What are some bicycle safety rules for riding in the street with motor vehicles?

Riding a bike is beneficial because it is exercise, and it conserves fuel; however,it must be done in a safe manner. Knowing proper protocol while riding in the street with motor vehicles is a must.

-Ride in the street about 2 or 3 feet from the curb.
-Always use hand signals before turning or stopping.
-Always obey stoplights and signs.
-Ride in a straight line… no weaving.
-Make eye contact with other drivers before turning.
-Watch carefully for cars.

For more information on riding your bike safely, contact your local Department of Transportation and ask for their published bike safety guide.

 
 


What is the difference between a compact crankshaft and a normal one, and what does a compact one get you?

A bicycle’s crankshaft drives the chain of your bike as you pedal. Most bicycles come equipped with either a double or triple crankshaft. A triple crankshaft gives you a greater lower range of gears, allowing you to pedal uphill.

Compact crankshafts are not new, but are just coming into popularity. They also give you a better lower range, but take away a bit at the higher range, unlike the double or triple crankshaft. The upside is that it is lighter weight than even a standard double. The downside is that you don’t get as great a lower end as a triple would give you and you do lose that bit at the high end.

So, if you need better low end gears on your racer, but don’t need all that a triple would provide, a lighter, compact crankshaft could be your answer.

 
 


What is the winning purse for the winner of the tour de france?

Held every July, the Tour de France has long been thought of as the toughest of races. Just to compete in it is a triumph in and above itself. For the winner though, the purse of 2 million French francs is quite a reward. In American money, it equals about $600,000. This