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Your Safety Is Our Priority. In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Access has taken several proactive measures to help safeguard your health while taking Access, including No Share-Rides and Enhanced Vehicle Cleaning.

To ensure the health and safety of our employees and riders, we are asking that you DO NOT schedule a trip using Access if you have been confirmed to have COVID-19, or are going to a facility to be tested for COVID-19.
Riders are encouraged to follow the Los Angeles County Safer at Home Emergency Order. If you must travel, please follow these guidelines:
• Cover your face while riding Access
• Do not use Access if you are sick
• Cover your coughs and sneezes
• Wash hands frequently with soap and warm water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Starting Monday, May 4th, Access will begin offering limited same day service. For further information on this and other COVID-19 programs, please click on the Coronavirus – COVID-19 Updates link in the Rider Alert Section below.

Your Safety Is Our Priority. In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Access has taken several proactive measures to help safeguard your health while taking Access, including No Share-Rides and Enhanced Vehicle Cleaning.

To ensure the health and safety of our employees and riders, we are asking that you DO NOT schedule a trip using Access if you have been confirmed to have COVID-19, or are going to a facility to be tested for COVID-19.
Riders are encouraged to follow the Los Angeles County Safer at Home Emergency Order. If you must travel, please follow these guidelines:
• Cover your face while riding Access
• Do not use Access if you are sick
• Cover your coughs and sneezes
• Wash hands frequently with soap and warm water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Starting Monday, May 4th, Access will begin offering limited same day service. For further information on this and other COVID-19 programs, please click on the Coronavirus – COVID-19 Updates link in the Rider Alert Section below.

Welcome to Access Services, the consolidated Transportation Services Agency (CTSA) for Los Angeles County.

Access Services is responsible for the administration of Access, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandated paratransit transportation program for Los Angeles County and is committed to improving the mobility on public transit of persons with disabilities.

Learn More About Riding Access

Source Article

Access to transportation and health care utilization in a rural region. – PubMed

CONTEXT:

Access to transportation to transverse the large distances between residences and health services in rural settings is a necessity. However, little research has examined directly access to transportation in analyses of rural health care utilization.

PURPOSE:

This analysis addresses the association of transportation and health care utilization in a rural region.

METHODS:

Using survey data from a sample of 1,059 households located in 12 western North Carolina counties, this analysis tests the relationship of different transportation measures to health care utilization while adjusting for the effects of personal characteristics, health characteristics, and distance.

FINDINGS:

Those who had a driver’s license had 2.29 times more health care visits for chronic care and 1.92 times more visits for regular checkup care than those who did not. Respondents who had family or friends who could provide transportation had 1.58 times more visits for chronic care than those who did not. While not significant in the multivariate analysis, the small number who used public transportation had 4 more chronic care visits per year than those who did not. Age and lower health status were also associated with increased health care visits. The transportation variables that were significantly associated with health care visits suggest that the underlying conceptual frameworks, the Health Behavior Model and Hagerstrand’s time geography, are useful for understanding transportation behavior.

CONCLUSIONS:

Further research must address the transportation behavior related to health care and the factors that influence this behavior. This information will inform policy alternatives to address geographic barriers to health care in rural communities.

Source Article

Massachusetts to close some park roadways to expand pedestrian, bicycle access

State officials said they would close some segments of three parkways to vehicular traffic in state parks and open it up to pedestrian and bicyclists in an effort to encourage social distancing. The sections of roadways will close to vehicular traffic on Friday at dusk and the Department of Conservation and Recreation said they will evaluate the effectiveness of the measure after the weekend. DCR said it will also reduce parking capacity at state parks statewide starting Saturday, and continue the measure indefinitely.Parkways that will open to pedestrians and cyclists include:William J. Day Boulevard between Farragut Road and Shore Drive in the city of Boston (South Boston)Francis Parkman Drive between Perkins Street and the Arborway in the city of Boston (Jamaica Plain)Greenough Boulevard (Little Greenough) between Arsenal Street and North Beacon Street in WatertownThe state urges people to only visit parks that are close to home, limit excursions to short periods of time and only participate in recreational activities that are transitory in nature, such as walking, jogging and biking.DCR stresses that if a park is crowded, visitors should visit a different location or return at a later date or time.

State officials said they would close some segments of three parkways to vehicular traffic in state parks and open it up to pedestrian and bicyclists in an effort to encourage social distancing.

The sections of roadways will close to vehicular traffic on Friday at dusk and the Department of Conservation and Recreation said they will evaluate the effectiveness of the measure after the weekend.

DCR said it will also reduce parking capacity at state parks statewide starting Saturday, and continue the measure indefinitely.

Parkways that will open to pedestrians and cyclists include:

  • William J. Day Boulevard between Farragut Road and Shore Drive in the city of Boston (South Boston)
  • Francis Parkman Drive between Perkins Street and the Arborway in the city of Boston (Jamaica Plain)
  • Greenough Boulevard (Little Greenough) between Arsenal Street and North Beacon Street in Watertown

The state urges people to only visit parks that are close to home, limit excursions to short periods of time and only participate in recreational activities that are transitory in nature, such as walking, jogging and biking.

DCR stresses that if a park is crowded, visitors should visit a different location or return at a later date or time.

Source Article

Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

Ahmed et al. [1] N = 413 adults
Urban (Dayton, Ohio), low SES 71 % female, 48 % Black, 42 % Appalachian Door to door survey on barriers to health care access “Difficulty finding transportation” (1) “Hard” or “very hard” time finding transportation (31 %) Arcury et al. [37] N = 1,059 adults
Rural (North Carolina), mixed SES, 662 female, 948 Whites, 112 Blacks Retrospective, comparing transportation barriers and health care utilization “Distance to care for… regular visit… for less serious emergency… for serious emergency” (3)
Has a driver’s license, any household member has a driver’s license, number of vehicles owned in household, days per week spent driving, relative or friend who regularly provides transportation for a family member, knowledge of organizations that provided transportation to health care and use of such transportation (7) Health care utilization associated with having a driver’s license (OR 2.29 more visits) and having a friend or relative who provides transportation (OR 1.58 more visits) Blazer et al. [14] N = 4,162 adults, age 65 +
Rural/Urban North Carolina), mixed SES, 62 % female, 68 % Non-Black (majority White) Retrospective cross-sectional survey (1986/87) analyzed for urban/rural variation of health service use, satisfaction, barriers to care Do you put off or neglect going to the doctor because of “distance or transportation”? (1) No difference between urban and rural residents in health service use; 7.7 % delayed care due to distance or transportation Borders et al. [54] N = 2,097 adults, age 65 +
Rural (West Texas), mixed SES 71 % female, 1949 Non-Hispanic, 148 Hispanic Telephone survey on barriers to health care access “Always/usually get transportation to doctor’s office” (1) Non- Hispanics (96 %) vs. Hispanics (90 %) could usually get transportation to clinic Branch et al. [36] N = 776 adults, age 65 +
Massachusetts, 95 % Medicare, 17 % Medicaid, 61 % privately insured, 64 % female Race not reported Retrospective survey interviews on barriers to health care access “You did not have a way to travel to the doctor” (1) Not having a way to get to the doctor (3 %); travel difficulties associated with lower income, being female, living alone, having less education Call et al. [56]b N = 1,853 Minnesota Health Care Plan adult and parent enrollees
Minnesota, 65 % female adult enrollees, 47 % female parent enrollees, 1,314 Whites, 539 American Indians Mailed survey on barriers to health care access “Difficulties with transportation” (1) American Indians (39 %) vs. Whites (18 %) have difficulties with transportation Canupp et al. [49] N = 163 adults, mean age 26 with spinal cord injuries
Birmingham, Alabama, 25 % had income greater than 25,000 dollars, 14 % female, 63 % white Face to face survey on barriers to follow- up appointments Obstacles for follow-up included distance to travel and availability of transportation (2) Non-compliance with appointments associated with distance to travel (P = 0.004) and availability of transportation (P = 0.033) Crain et al. [15]b N = 1,376 caretakers of