Burns & McDonnell Bolsters Transportation Construction Capabilities, Hiring Steve Kellerman

“Transportation infrastructure is the lifeblood of the U.S. economy, and strengthening this foundational system will be imperative moving forward from a global crisis,” says Mike DeBacker, vice president and Transportation Group general manager at Burns & McDonnell. “Steve is deeply passionate about designing and building innovative transportation infrastructure that will support our communities for generations. His wealth of industry experience, robust leadership abilities and dynamic vision perfectly position him to lead our transportation construction services in this critical moment and beyond.”

With two decades of transportation construction experience, Kellerman has spearheaded large-scale infrastructure projects for public and private sector clients throughout the Midwest. As chief engineer for a regional construction company, he oversaw construction of major interchanges, bridges and interstates and led development projects for residential, commercial and retail properties.

Most recently, Kellerman served as third-party manager for a $288 million design-build project in eastern Kansas, supporting the construction of 27 bridges and two diverging diamond interchanges. 

“Now more than ever, complex transportation projects require multidisciplinary collaboration and reliable, cost-effective design,” Kellerman says. “I am proud to lead a team that has decades of experience in designing and building some of the nation’s most challenging transportation structures. We diligently assess a project’s unique risks, complexity, budget and schedule to tailor our approach and deliver solutions that meet and exceed our clients’ expectations.”

Backed by a nationwide team, the firm’s alternative delivery services provide a full range of delivery options for transportation projects, including:

  • Construction management
  • Design-build
  • Design-bid-build
  • Engineer-procure-construct (EPC)
  • Owner’s engineer
  • Program management

“As our clients continue to move toward more integrated delivery models, our commitment to each project remains the same: Make sure it’s done safely, on schedule and on budget,” says Matt Ralston, senior vice president and Construction/Design-Build Group general manager at Burns & McDonnell. “With the tools, resources and attitude necessary to provide high-quality, turnkey solutions, transportation agencies trust us to routinely execute comprehensive design and construction projects. We are designed to build transportation infrastructure that will stand the test of time as the foundation of our country’s growth and economic prosperity.”

Kellerman is a licensed professional engineer in Kansas and Missouri and previously served on the board of directors for the Heavy Constructors Association of Kansas City. He earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

For photos and support materials, please visit our MEDIA KIT.

About Burns & McDonnell
Burns & McDonnell is a family of companies bringing together an unmatched team of 7,600 engineers, construction professionals, architects, planners, technologists and scientists to design and build our critical infrastructure. With an integrated construction and design mindset, we offer full-service capabilities with more than 55 offices, globally. Founded in 1898, Burns & McDonnell is a 100% employee-owned company and proud to be on Fortune‘s 2020 list of 100 Best Companies to Work For. Learn how we are on call through it all.

Contact: Mary Young, Burns & McDonnell
816-822-4369  
[email protected]

SOURCE Burns &

Automation in the automotive industry



Challenges in the Automotive Industry


The automotive industry is very dynamic and requires extreme flexibility from automotive manufacturers. The growing global competition demands smart production systems, combined with flexible logistics systems. They can be adapted quickly and thus also serve the ever-increasing demand for model diversity. In addition to the installation, a simple operation of the system plays an important role.

Automotive manufacturers increasingly find that they have to expand their core competencies in areas ranging from automotive industry to mobility or even to re-define those areas. They are only able to stand in the competition if they could cope with developments around Industrie 4.0, demographic change and data-driven production.

 



Solutions for the automotive industry


KUKA offers you the necessary configuration options to meet all the automotive challenges efficiently: through adaptable, modular and automated production and logistics processes, we pave the way to sustainable success in the automotive industry.

Our services and expertises 

KUKA solutions represent a complete line of services. Our automation concepts are created individually for your plant. Through our extensive expertise, we can offer you all process steps. KUKA is the only supplier where you can get production, logistics, and components from a single source:

  • Engineering: Leverage on years of experience to develop efficient production solutions for the automotive industry.
  • Project management: Rely on our know-how. We offer professional advice in a timely manner.
  • Testing and process knowledge: Our 2,500-square-meter TechCenter provides realistic experimental setups that could generate reliable project data. Based on our comprehensive knowledge, we develop the best solution for you.

 

In order to develop our robot-based automation solutions continuously, we work together with all leading manufacturers. For instance, with the innovative combination of hardware and software, we create a unique productive cooperation between human beings and robots, which is as important as the career stability of workers.

Robots and software

Whether you want to plan new systems or to optimize existing systems, KUKA provides the right software for you. Our services range from extensible system software to prefabricated robot applications, software-based controls and 3D visualization and simulation. By that, we support intelligent robot networking and secure interaction between men and machine. We always provide you with a user-friendly interface and guarantee 100% compatibility. With KUKA software, your robots and systems are always programmed for enhanced productivity.

Our key to success: Assembly & Test

Our Assembly & Test division headquarter in Bremen has supplied countless customers and partners from the automotive industry with assembly systems and test equipment since 1982. On the area of more than 18,000 square meters, we plan, design and manufacture computer-controlled automation equipment for the efficient assembly of serial products such as engines, cylinder heads, axles, brakes and steering systems. Our automotive experts are also always ready to assist you in terms of process planning, customer training or after-sales service.



Innovations and successes for the automotive industry


Unlawful Vehicle Modifications: State Laws

State Statute Alabama Regulation of Operation of Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(AL Code Title 32, Ch. 5, scroll to Article 9)
Window Tinting (AL Code Title 32, Ch. 5C)

Alaska

Vehicle Equipment Standards

(AK Statutes scroll to section 28.05.081)

Arizona Equipment

(ARS Title 28 scroll to 28-921 to 28-966)

Arkansas Size and Load Regulations

(AR Code Title 27, Ch. 35)
Equipment Regulations (AR Code Title 27, Ch. 37)

California Division 12 – Equipment of Vehicles (scroll down)

(California Vehicle Code)

Colorado Regulation of Vehicles and Traffic: Equipment

(CRS Title 42 scroll to 42-4-201 to 42-4-239)

Connecticut Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(GSC Ch. 246 scroll to section 14-80 to 14-106)

Delaware Equipment Requirements

(DE Code Title 21, Ch. 43, Subchapter I)
Lights (DE Code Title 21, Ch. 43, Subchapter II)

District of Columbia

D.C. Vehicle Code (scroll to Title 50)

Florida State Uniform Traffic Control: Equipment

(FS Ch. 316 scroll to 316.217 to 316.455)

Georgia Vehicles and equipment

(Georgia Code §sect; 40-8-7 to 40-8-90)

Hawaii Street rod vehicle requirements

(HRS section 286-26.5)

Idaho Vehicle Equipment

(ID Statutes Title 49, Ch. 9)

Illinois Equipment of Vehicles

(625 ILCS 5, Chapter 12)

Indiana Motor Vehicle Equipment

(Indiana Code Title 9, Article 19)

Iowa Vehicle Equipment

(IA Code Ch. 321 scroll to 321.384 to 321.481 )

Kansas Equipment of Vehicles

(KS Statutes Ch. 8, Article 17)

Kentucky Vehicle Equipment

(KRS Chapter 189 scroll to sections .020 to .205)

Louisiana Motor Vehicles and Traffic Regulation: Equipment

(LRS Title 32 scroll to 32:301 to 32:369)
Low rider vehicles (LRS 32:297)
Proper equipment required on vehicles (LRS 32:53)

Maine Equipment

(MRS Title 29-A Chapter 17)

Maryland Equipment of Vehicles

(MD Transp. Code Title 22)

Massachusetts Operation of unregistered or improperly equipped motor vehicles

(90 MGL section 9)

Michigan Equipment

(MI Vehicle Code sections 257.683 to 257.711)
After-Market Lighting [PDF] (MI State Police)

Minnesota Traffic Regulations: Equipment

(MN Statutes Ch. 169; scroll to 169.47 to 169.75)

Mississippi Equipment and Identification

(MS Code Title 63, Ch. 7)

Missouri Vehicle Equipment Regulations

(MRS Chapter 307)

Montana Vehicle Equipment

(MCA Title 61, Ch. 9)

Nebraska Vehicle equipment and violations

(R.R.S. Nebr. § 60-6, 220 et al.)

Nevada Equipment of Vehicles

(NRS 484.541 to 484.646)

New Hampshire Equipment of Vehicles

(NH Statutes Ch. 266)

New Jersey Motor vehicle equipment

(NJ Statutes 39:3-46 to 39:3-84)

New Mexico Motor Vehicles: Equipment

(NMS Ch. 66, Article 3 scroll to Part 9)

New York Equipment of Motor Vehicles and Motorcycles

(NY Vehicle & Traffic Code Article 9)

North Carolina Motor Vehicle Act: Equipment

(NCGS Ch. 20, Article 3 scroll to sections 20-122 to 20-137)

North Dakota Equipment of Vehicles

[PDF] (ND Code Chapter 39-21)
Size, Width, and Height Restrictions [PDF] (ND Code Chapter 39-12)

Ohio Traffic Laws: Equipment

(ORC Chapter 4513)

Oklahoma Vehicle equipment

(OK Statutes Title 47 scroll to 47-12-101)

Oregon Vehicle Equipment Generally

[PDF] (OR Vehicle Code Ch. 815)
Vehicle Equipment Lights [PDF] (OR Vehicle Code Ch. 816)

Pennsylvania Equipment Standards

[PDF] (PA Vehicle Code Ch. 41)
Lighting Equipment [PDF] (PA Vehicle Code Ch. 43)
Other

Vehicle identification number – Wikipedia

VIN visible in the windshield
VIN recorded on a Chinese vehicle license

A vehicle identification number (VIN) is a unique code, including a serial number, used by the automotive industry to identify individual motor vehicles, towed vehicles, motorcycles, scooters and mopeds, as defined in ISO 3779 (content and structure) and ISO 4030 (location and attachment).

VINs were first used in 1954 in the United States.[1] From 1954 to 1981, there was no accepted standard for these numbers, so different manufacturers used different formats.

In 1954, at the request of the US government, the US auto manufacturers and the Automobile Manufacturers Association were involved in the creation of the new, standardized vehicle identification numbering system named the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) with an agreed upon digit sequence and concealed chassis markings of this VIN. Up to that time, states used the engine number to register and title cars and trucks which became a problem if the engine was replaced which was fairly common at the time.[citation needed]

In 1981, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of the United States standardized the format.[1] It required all on-road vehicles sold to contain a 17-character VIN, which does not include the letters O (o), I (i), and Q (q) (to avoid confusion with numerals 0, 1, and 9).

There are vehicle history services in several countries that help potential car owners use VINs to find vehicles that are defective or have been written off.

Classification[edit]

There are at least four competing standards used to calculate the VIN.

  • FMVSS 115, Part 565: Used in United States and Canada[2]
  • ISO Standard 3779: Used in Europe and many other parts of the world
  • SAE J853: Very similar to the ISO standard
  • ADR 61/2 used in Australia, referring to ISO 3779 and 3780[3]

Components[edit]

Modern VINs are based on two related standards, originally issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1979 and 1980: ISO 3779[4] and ISO 3780,[5] respectively. Compatible but different implementations of these ISO standards have been adopted by the European Union and the United States, respectively.[6]

The VIN comprises the following sections:

World manufacturer identifier[edit]

The first three characters uniquely identify the manufacturer of the vehicle using the world manufacturer identifier or WMI code. A manufacturer who builds fewer than 1000 vehicles per year uses a 9 as the third digit, and the 12th, 13th and 14th position of the VIN for a second part of the identification. Some manufacturers use the third character as a code for a vehicle category (e.g., bus or truck), a division within a manufacturer, or both. For example, within 1G (assigned to General Motors in the United States), 1G1 represents Chevrolet passenger cars; 1G2, Pontiac passenger cars; and 1GC, Chevrolet trucks.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) in the US assigns WMIs to countries and manufacturers.[8]

The first character of the WMI is the region

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Source Article

List of bicycle brands and manufacturing companies

Wikimedia list article

This page lists notable bicycle brands and manufacturing companies past and present. This article relates to pedal cycles. tricycles and power assisted cycles but does not include Motorcycles. For bicycle parts, see List of bicycle part manufacturing companies.

Many bicycle brands do not manufacture their own product, but rather import and re-brand bikes manufactured by others (e.g., Nishiki), sometimes designing the bike, specifying the equipment, and providing quality control. There are also brands that have, at different times, been manufacturers as well as re-branders: a company with manufacturing capability may market models made by other (overseas) factories, while simultaneously manufacturing bicycles in-house, for example, high-end models.[1]

Only brands or manufacturers that are notable as a bicycle brand should be included. If no page exists for the company or brand, then the page to be linked to should be created first or a reference provided as to its notability or the entry will probably be removed.

International manufacturers[edit]

Bicycle manufacturers are in many cases members of “Groups”, i.e. they have several product names – so-called “brands”. Examples include the following:

  • Calcott Brothers – UK (defunct)
  • Calfee Design – United States
  • Caloi – Brazil
  • Campion Cycle Company – UK
  • Cannondale – an American division of Canadian conglomerate Dorel Industries
  • Canyon bicycles – Germany
  • Catrike – United States (Recumbent trikes)
  • CCM – Canada
  • Centurion – United States
  • Cervélo – Canada
  • Chater-Lea – UK
  • Chicago Bicycle Company – United States (defunct)
  • CHUMBA – United States
  • Cilo – Switzerland
  • Cinelli – Italy
  • Clark-Kent – United States (defunct)
  • Claud Butler – UK
  • Clément – France (defunct)
  • Co-Motion Cycles – United States
  • Coker – United States
  • Colnago – Italy road bike benders
  • Columbia Bicycles – United States
  • Corima – France
  • Cortina Cycles – United States
  • Coventry-Eagle – UK (defunct – see Falcon Cycles)
  • Cruzbike – United States, recumbent
  • Currys – UK, no longer makes bicycles
  • Cycle Force Group – United States
  • Cycles Devinci – Canada
  • Cycleuropa Group – Sweden, manufactures such brands as: Bianchi, Crescent, DBS, Everton, Gitane, Kildemoes, Legnano, Micmo, Monark, Puch, Spectra, and Cyclepro
  • Cyfac – France
  • Dahon – United States, China
  • Dario Pegoretti – Italy
  • Dawes Cycles – UK
  • Defiance Cycle Company – UK (defunct)
  • Demorest – United States (restructured as Lycoming Foundry and Machine Company and discontinued bicycle manufacturing)
  • Den Beste Sykkel (better known as DBS) – Norway
  • Derby Cycle – Germany, owns Kalkhoff, Focus, Nishiki, Rixe, Raleigh and Univega
  • De Rosa – Italy
  • Cycles Devinci – Canada (not to be confused with daVinci Designs of United States, who make tandems.)
  • Di Blasi Industriale – Italy
  • Diamant – Germany. Owned by Trek
  • Diamant – Norway
  • Diamondback Bicycles – United States
  • Dolan Bikes – UK
  • Dorel Industries – Canada, owns Pacific Cycle and markets under brand names including Cannondale, Iron Horse, Schwinn, Mongoose, Roadmaster, and GT
  • Dunelt – UK (defunct)
  • Dynacraft – United States, owns Magna and Next

{div col end}}

  • Kalkhoff – Germany
  • Kangaroo – UK
  • Karbon Kinetics Limited – UK
  • Kawasaki
  • K2 Sports – United

Victoria Transport Institute – Online TDM Encyclopedia

 

 


Online TDM Encyclopedia
Transportation Demand Management (TDM, also called Mobility Management) is a general
term for strategies that result in more efficient use of transportation
resources. This Encyclopedia is a comprehensive source of information
about innovative management solutions
to transportation problems. It provides
detailed information on dozens of demand management strategies, plus general
information on TDM planning and evaluation techniques. It is produced
by the Victoria Transport Policy Institute to increase
understanding and implementation of TDM.

Contents

Overview
Strategies To Achieve Specific Objectives
Best Strategies For Various Organizations and Stakeholder Groups
TDM Strategies

   Improved Transport Options

   Incentives To Use Alternative Modes and Reduce Driving
   Parking and Land Use Management
   Policy And Institutional Reforms
TDM Programs and Program Support
TDM Planning and Evaluation
Reference Information


Overview

These chapters describe this Encyclopedia and TDM.


Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia | Public Transportation

Reader-Nominated Topic

For more than three centuries public transportation has helped both to shape and define the Greater Philadelphia region. Befitting one of the world’s largest cities, Philadelphia and its hinterland have been served by a bewildering array of transportation options, and these vehicles and routes have helped to define the extent of the region.

Public transportation – consisting of vehicles that operate on fixed routes used by the public – began in the region in 1688 with a ferry between Philadelphia and what is now Camden, New Jersey. This early line, though not a success, spawned additional ferry service and quickly established a Philadelphia hinterland in New Jersey. It was an early example of land outside Pennsylvania being tied economically and culturally to the city and established a precedent for southern New Jersey to develop in association with Philadelphia.

It would be more than one hundred years before local public transportation extended beyond ferries, but during the early nineteenth century an explosion of options developed as the city sought to expand both physically within the region and economically across the region and nation. In December 1831, Philadelphia ceased to be a walking city for those who could afford the fares of the new omnibus service in the city and its immediate suburbs in the county. The next year saw the introduction of commuter trains on the Philadelphia, Germantown & Norristown Rail Road, which allowed the middle classes and above to separate home from work not just within the city but also in portions of Philadelphia County like East Falls, Germantown, and Chestnut Hill, and in neighboring Montgomery County. 

Not long after Philadelphia’s political consolidation in 1854, the streetcar, a technological change in public transportation, became the vehicle that allowed the city’s grid to expand throughout the once rural county. On January 20, 1858, the first streetcars in the region began to be operated by the Frankford and Southwark Philadelphia City Passenger Railway Company. These horse-drawn streetcars quickly replaced omnibuses as the streetcars were larger, quicker, and more profitable. Soon the streetcars extended throughout the region to areas previously poorly served by public transportation. Coupled with an expansion in commuter rail service, Philadelphia could justly claim one of the finest transportation systems in country by the time of the nation’s Centennial Exhibition in 1876.

Network of Streetcars and Trains

print depicting Cooper's Ferry

Cooper’s Ferry helped to establish an early transportation link between Philadelphia, all of New Jersey, and New York. (Historical Society of Pennsylvania)

By the 1880s, middle-class Philadelphians had a more-than-adequate system of horse-drawn streetcars and steam-hauled commuter trains to serve their transportation needs in both the booming metropolis and its expanding hinterland in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The lines of privately-owned streetcar companies occupied every major (and many minor) streets in Center City and extended southward, westward, and northward from the original urban core along the Delaware River into the adjoining neighborhoods. In addition to these routes centered on the business district, a large number of local lines operated in the

DRAMATIC VIDEO: Wisconsin Cops Uses PIT Maneuver To Stop Driver Of Stolen Car But Suspect Doesn’t Go Quietly

GREENFIELD, Wisconsin — On Tuesday, 05/05/20, at 12:44AM in the 4700 block of South 27th Street, a Greenfield Police Officer observed a vehicle matching the description of a vehicle reported stolen through the Oak Creek Police Department. The
officer attempted to stop the vehicle and the suspect vehicle fled northbound on South 27th Street.

A PIT (Pursuit Intervention Technique) maneuver was successfully performed at South 11th Street and West Oklahoma Avenue. Three passengers fled on foot from the vehicle. The driver continued his reckless behavior, attempting to flee in the stolen vehicle by ramming an occupied, fully marked Greenfield patrol squad.

The officer was not injured and continued to attempt to stop the suspect’s dangerous actions. After several attempts the vehicle was disabled and the driver was taken into custody.

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Source Article

vehicle – Dizionario inglese-italiano WordReference






Principal Translations/Traduzioni principali
vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (motorized: car, truck) autoveicolo, automezzo, veicolo nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore
  Frank had to walk, as he didn’t have a vehicle.
  Frank dovette camminare perché non aveva un veicolo.
 
Traduzioni aggiuntive
vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (not motorized: bike, stroller) veicolo, mezzo nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore
  Janet’s only vehicle was her bike.
  L’unico mezzo di Janet era la bici.
vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (way to express [sth](di espressione) veicolo, mezzo nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore
  The editor used the newspaper as a vehicle for his personal opinions.
  Il redattore usava il giornale come mezzo per le sue opinioni personali.
vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (for performer) mezzo nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore
  The film is a perfect vehicle for this actor.
  Il film è un mezzo perfetto per questo attore.
vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (pharmacological medium) eccipiente nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore

Compound Forms/Forme composte
all-terrain vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (quad bike) (veicolo a quattro ruote) quad nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore
    ATV abbrabbreviazione: Contrazione o forma abbreviata di una parola, o sigla o acronimo: q.b., S.V., p.v., ca., ecc.
ATV nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. initialism (all-terrain vehicle) (tipo di veicolo) ATV nm, abbrabbreviazione maschile: Contrazione, o sigla, o acronimo, usato come un sostantivo di genere maschile: “Il CONI organizza l’evento” – “Il PPI fu sciolto con l’inizio della dittatura”
   (tipo di veicolo) quad nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore
mobility vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (motorized buggy for the disabled) veicolo per disabili nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che assume genere maschile: medico, gatto, strumento, assegno, dolore
motor vehicle nnoun: Refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc. (vehicle moved by engine) veicolo a motore nmsostantivo maschile: Identifica un essere, un oggetto o un concetto che